• Application deadline

    15 May

    There is currently no maximum capacity in place for this master. Applicants who submit a complete application by the 15 May deadline and meet the minimum requirements listed above, will be offered admission.

  • Starting date

    August 2023

  • Format

    Full-time | 12 months

  • Credits

    60

  • Fee

    €2,209 (EEA)* | €21,500 (non-EEA)

    * 2023/2024 fee is still to be determined
    Find more information below

  • Language

    English

RSM is planning to change the name of the degree MSc Human Resource Management to MSc People, Organisations and Change in order to better reflect the inclusion of the new track in Organisation Development and Change. The new name is planned to be in effect as of academic year 2022/2023 and will be changed here once the new name has been approved by the accreditation body and amended in the national register.

Good people management is at the heart of successful organisations. Global trends such as increasing digitisation, changing forms of organisation, an ageing workforce, and an increasing need to lead processes of development, change and renewal, bring challenges and opportunities in this field. This programme combines theory and practice to enable you to develop evidence-based solutions for real business problems.

Learn to think critically – to make better people-related decisions and to create positive change for individuals and organisations. Data is an important part of your toolkit as a manager, consultant or HR professional. You’ll learn all about this in our course on people analytics, which focuses on making data-driven decisions.

  • 31% international students in programme
  • 87% of graduates employed within 3 months after graduation
  • Examples of your future job title: HR Manager; Management Consultant; Management Trainee

 

 

What you will learn

After you build a solid grounding through your core courses, you then choose your own path through the MSc by selecting electives that match your career goals. This choice is provided through one of three specialisations:

  • Human resource leadership
  • Organisational development and change
  • Generalist track.

Graduates of RSM’s MSc in Human Resource Management start their careers knowing how to enable others to perform at their best  while experiencing positive working lives, and how to lead change and development empathetically and effectively. Recent graduates work as HR business partner, recruitment consultant, people experience lead, associate consultant, HR co-ordinator, business analyst, programme manager, and business consultant. 

Our graduates work in large multinationals, small start-ups, private sector, public sector and not-for-profit organisations. The MSc HRM also prepares you well for a career in any other people management or leadership role. Some of our alumni move out of HRM specialisations into general management or start their own business.

Experience positive working lives

Learn to know how to enable others to perform at their best while experiencing positive working lives

Lead change and development

Learn how to lead change and development empathetically and effectively

Leadership role

Be prepared for a career in any other people management or leadership role

Programme highlights

  • Small group learning environment

    Get to know your fellow students and professors well in a highly interactive – and highly international – class.

  • Research-based curriculum

    All your courses draw on the latest research evidence and you learn it directly from our international researchers and business practitioners.

  • Multi-disciplinary

    We introduce you to a wide range of perspectives to critically evaluate and effectively lead processes of organising, development and people, and change at various levels.

  • Build practical experience

    Learn, develop and apply evidence-based recommendations to real business problems, which you present to a company in the live case study, or during your internship.

  • Grow your network

    Meet RSM’s alumni network throughout the programme; when you visit companies, and during guest lectures and at events. These partnerships with businesses mean multiple opportunities to start growing your career.

More about the programme

Curriculum

The RSM MSc in Human Resource Management programme is one academic year’s duration. Core courses are compulsory and will be offered during the autumn semester (22 EC). Master electives (18 EC) are offered during the spring semester, of which one elective can be chosen from another MSc programme. During the year, students work on a master thesis project (20 EC).

Please note that certain electives may be very popular. Although we can place most students in the elective(s) of their choice, there are no guaranteed places.

I TEACH MSc Human Resource Management

A teacher's story

  View all core courses below:

Whether you’re a future employee, consultant, manager, leader or HR professional, people management is important to you. It is through people that most organisations create value – for the organization but also for other stakeholders. But what does the famous phrase “our people are our most valuable asset” really mean? What is value and where does it come from? 
 
In this course we will look at questions such as; how can we manage people in a way to enhance both organisational performance and employee wellbeing? How can we ensure that our people management practices align to the goals of the organization and constantly changing external demands? What is the role of people management in 21st century organisations? 
 
This is a highly interactive course which blends recorded knowledge clips with face-to-face discussion and active participation in small group activities. In class you will be guided through activities which focus on testing theory, and you will apply your new knowledge in the MSc company project. Through this you will work with a real organisation to analyse key strategic people-related problems and make evidence-based recommendations for how to address these. You are encouraged to be critical and inquisitive, and by the end of the course our goal is that you will be able to turn research into practice to create value through people management. 

Taught by Dr R. Hewett.

In this course, we will deal with strategic and organizational design as a managerial approach to demands for change in the organization. The concepts and theories in organizational Design is presented in the context of the multi-contingency approach and its application in a dynamic perspective. The multi-contingency model is following the information-processing paradigm where strategic and organizational fit and misfit are important concepts. A fit is an alignment between the organization and its environment, strategy, technology, management style or size. The theory of fit provides management with an opportunity to assess the organization design and change it regularly. The issues include multi-dimensional relationships, non-linearity and longitudinal perspectives - all important elements in studies of new forms of organization. 

Taught by Prof Dr G. Hendrikse.

In 21st century organisations, the only constant seems to be change. Especially organisations that link to the global market are multifaceted, difficult to fully grasp and hard to manage. This course focuses on the challenges that organisational change brings with specific attention for the critical elements that drive behavioural change throughout an organisation.  It takes a multilevel perspective, starting with how the executive leaders play an essential role in foreseeing and establishing positive change, to getting the people within an organization on board, and the building of teams that can take change to the next level.  Specific attention will be given to dealing with resistance, building resilience and the political skills needed to create strategic alignment throughout an organisation.  

Taught by Prof Dr D. van Dierendonck.

Most organizations today collect a wealth of data that could help people management become more evidence-based and impact-driven, and in turn help employees live up to their full potential. However, only few companies manage to use their people data to the benefit of business results. People Analytics could potentially fill this void.  

People Analytics constitutes the analytic approach to and statistical analysis of Human Resource (HR) and workforce data to the benefit of employee performance and the organization’s return of investment on human capital. This phenomenon gained traction in recent years, as a movement that could evolve the way we make decisions concerning people-management. It seeks to add value to organizations by leveraging analytical processes, a broad range of statistical techniques, and novel data sources. Moreover, where the returns of investment on human capital have traditionally been considered opaque, People Analytics promises to reveal the bottom line of HR practices, interventions, and investments. 

In this course, you learn how People Analytics can be used to improve business outcomes and make better management decisions. Through a sequence of readings, lectures, cases, and experiential exercises, you will learn how to leverage people analytics as a skillset, toolset, and mindset. You will learn what questions to ask, how to determine which methods to use, and how to communicate ideas effectively. This should not only help those who seek to become an HR professional but should help you stand out as a manager and business leader. 

Taught by Dr C. Lee.

The aim of ‘Your Future Career’ is to prepare RSM students at an early stage in their master's for their careers.

The online modules will help you make crucial steps towards the most suitable career step, whether an internship or a job.

To pass the course, you need to gain a minimum number of points within a few months. You can decide if you want to reflect on your interests and motivations, develop knowledge of the job market, receive peer feedback on application materials, learn to love networking, or attend an interactive alumni career panel or workshop.

See this page for more details.

 

This course is overseen and guided by Dr Maciej Szymanowski and Lisanne Keir

 

Professional Development and Consulting runs from September till December and forms the foundation in which students connect core course knowledge to skills development, personal development, and a real-life organisational context.

The main objective of this course is to help students be aware of their competencies and further develop these. Competencies consists of knowledge, skills, and attitude and therefore within this course students will gain new skills, work on their professional development, and connect the knowledge they acquired in our four knowledge courses (Strategic HRM, Organisational Design, People Analytics and Leading Organisational Change) to a real-life organisational context.

More specifically, this course consists of three elements:

  • Company Project. In teams, our students will step in the role of consultant and apply newly learned competencies a real-life organisation. The objective is that the student consultants will develop new and interesting insights and advice for a great variety of companies.
  • Skills Workshops. We prepare students to enter a knowledge course by training them on skills needed in that specific course. Students will follow workshops to develop these skills (e.g. leadership, collaboration, visualization and decision making).
  • Portfolio. In tandem with the project and workshops, our students will work on their portfolio. Based on self-assessment and feedback received by peers and professors, we encourage students to regularly reflect. Students will engage in mentoring circles (3 peers and an alum) aimed at students supporting each other and grow together. In doing so, students will be able to critically evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses and develop further.

Taught by J. Werkhoven MSc.

The Organisation Development and Change (ODC) elective track of the MSc HRM is for aspiring change agents. More than ever organisations are in a constant state of development and change and good leaders are needed to help organisations cope with these processes. In the ODC you will develop your ability to critically evaluate change situations, engage with change constructively, and work with all actors in change processes appreciatively and effectively, delivering inspiring, responsible and sustainable results.    

Example future careers for students taking this track:

  • Business consultant
  • Organization design analyst
  • Agile specialist  
  • Program manager
  • Process manager
  • Business analyst

Courses included in this track include (you choose two or three):

This course addresses the process of organizational development and change, with a particular focus on the role of professional facilitators of these processes. It is relevant for students seeking to improve their understanding of both leading and contributing to change. The course is taught as an elective in the MSc HRM but is equally relevant for students from other programs that want to complement their professional specialism with a course on leading and managing change. While the field of organization development and change has a long history with valuable contributions dating back to the 1940s and 1950s that are still relevant, the past 20 years have shown important changes in how we organize work and how we deal with change. This course provides an up-to-date consideration of the key relevant insights in the field that are relevant for all professionally engaging with change in roles such as HR, line management, project management and consultants. As elective in the last round of electives it offers the participants the possibility to explore the issues around people, organization and change and connect them to their own field of specialization. In the weekly meetings, required readings are discussed and student teams present short assignments directly related to the topic of the specific meeting. In the course we will address the experience of change, diagnosing change situations and resistance to change, managing the client (scoping and presenting change), implementing change (change dynamics and change design), and the role of the change agent.

Taught by Dr B.A.S. Koene

The list of skills necessary for working in any organisational environment is long. In this course, we will use the method of process consultation to pay attention to how people can advise.  This will result in increased communication, advisory and coaching skills.

This course focuses on how students communicate and react to other people in different contexts. The course is designed to enable the students to build and develop their advisory skills and to increase knowledge of the concepts behind them, so as to widen the choice of possible actions in a given situation and to develop the understanding of the strengths and weakness of their advisory skills. By the end of the course we will have provided the students with an opportunity to learn about and practice by understanding and diagnosing contexts and give advice. Guests, consultants, trainers and managers can also provide lectures.

Taught by Dr M.J. Flory.

Management Consulting is for many business students a challenging, yet rewarding profession. Rivalry within the industry is intense and client demands and expectations are high. Are you up for the challenge of becoming a successful management consultant? And what would you have to learn still, to kick-start a possible career in this competitive industry?

Consultants are important agents of organisational change, applying and transferring knowledge about business problems to advice and - increasingly - to assist managers to deal with such problems. Many business students will act as or deal with consultants sometime in their professional life. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the consulting practice, the consulting industry and to develop your cognitive skills. This is done by explaining concepts and through close interaction and collaboration with professional consultants.

During class, you will get to take responsibility for designing effective lectures in co-creation with your professor, professional consultants or specialist from the field as well as your fellow students. You will interact with experienced professionals, and guide a learning-process in which you and your fellow students learn the essentials that may help pursue a career in consulting. Amongst other things, in this class we discuss the need and role of management consultants, how management consultants deliver their services and how consultancies organize ethical and sustainable services for their clients.

Taught by K. Rapaka.

Contents, course description

Organisations are constantly faced with external pressures to change their policies and practices – voiced by various stakeholders in their environment. Some of these pressures – so-called institutional pressures – will drive an organisation to become more similar to other organisations and adhere to state-of-the-art ways of doing things. Other pressures – competitive pressures – will instead drive an organisation to become more different from other organisations and develop new ways of doing things. And yet other pressures – normative pressures – will drive an organisation to position itself with respect to the moral order of society. Many organisational change programs – such as BPE, TQM, ERP implementations, innovation management programmes, mergers and acquisitions, sustainability standards, CSR programmes, and others – are the result of organisations’ efforts to deal with such manifold pressures from their environment.

How, under these conditions, should leaders steer an organisation’s development and change? Doing so raises difficult questions for leaders. How can their organisation walk the tightrope of adhering to established ways of doing things whilst also being distinct from their competitors? How much should their organisation change to conform with its environment? And how much should it rather change in opposition to its environment? And how may it even become a force for change within its environment, changing not only itself but also other organisations?

This course addresses these questions and in doing so develops a bird’s-eye-view of organisational responses to pressures for change, conceptualizing the organisation as embedded into different environments. It will integrate core theoretical concepts, including from institutional theory and strategic management, to help you understand how organisations respond to external pressures through changing their policies and practices.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain how organisations are embedded in their environment and how external pressures for change are caused
  2. Evaluate different organisational responses to environmental pressures
  3. Critically evaluate organisations’ ability to respond positively to pressures for change and themselves become a force for positive change in society
  4. Develop theoretically sound real-life recommendations for responses to external pressures

Incentives are what drive modern organizations, and employees tend to respond strongly to them. Well-designed incentives encourage employees to use their abilities and knowledge in the firm’s interests. They serve also an important role in recruitment in order to attract the right people to join and stay with the enterprise. Organizations have to address therefore their internal dynamics and external market environment simultaneously in order to create value.

Organizations are not only in markets, but also an alternative to markets. They tend to have characteristics that set them apart from markets, such as employees supplying a subset of their liberties to management, specific human capital, long term relationships, and various possibilities to do more (make better decisions) than any single individual. These features raise issues regarding the determinants of well-functioning organizations, such as ‘Who decides?’ (the allocation of authority, formal versus real authority, access; relational contracts; ratification and monitoring in decision control, and initiation and implementation in decision management; task design; conflict resolution; enforcement mechanisms; talent allocation across hierarchical positions; incompatible languages and communication failures; rigid cultures, …) and ‘Benefits and Costs’ (short-termism, hard versus soft information, vested interests in payment schemes; hiring decisions; …). They will be characterized as motivation problems (employees’ and organization’s interests differ), alignment challenges (lack of coordination across departments), and bounded cognition problems (lack of the necessary information to do so). Successful organizations address them in order to develop and implement policies to create value.

Taught by Prof. G. Hendrikse.

The Human Resource Leadership (HRL) track of the MSc HRM helps students to gain a deeper understanding of the management of people in organisations. In new organisation forms, digitisation of working life, and with external trends such as an ageing workforce come exciting opportunities and difficult challenges. In the HRL track you will develop your knowledge of people management in the context of these dynamics, and your ability to apply critical thinking to solving real life management problems.

Example future careers for students taking this track:

  • HR business partner
  • Consultant
  • HR analyst
  • Reward analyst
  • Recruitment specialist
  • Learning & development specialist

Courses included in this track include (you choose two or three):

Leaders are key players in organizational functioning because they critically affect the people they work with—both inside and outside of their organization. Leaders are in a unique position to mobilise employees to excel and contribute to the organisation’s mission and vision. At the same time, however, they may also be a primary source of conflict and demotivation. Understanding what makes for high performance leadership as well as where leadership can go wrong, therefore, is of critical importance to any aspiring leader; and in particular for HR professionals who may come to take the lead of the HR organization, as well as facilitate the process of leadership in their organization.

In this course, we address one key question: “what makes an effective leader?” from a range of different theoretical perspectives (e.g., social identity, visionary leadership) and cast in the context of contemporary workplace trends (e.g., demographic change, digitization). Through a sequence of readings, lectures, cases, and experiential exercises, students learn to understand and apply state-of-the-art leadership theories, analyse and evaluate the determinants of leadership successes and failures, as well as apply these learnings to make recommendations for real-world leadership challenges.

Taught by Dr T. Davidson.

This course will provide insights into the complex topic of diversity in organizations and will examine how diversity can effectively be managed in organizations. At the end of the course, students understand the core diversity theories and empirical research insights, can critically evaluate the operation and effects of diversity across individual, team, and organizational levels, and apply their learnings to real-world diversity challenges by identifying how human resource management (HRM) can contribute to the effective management of diversity in organizations. 

Taught by Dr A. Burmeister.

Ask any business leader to mention the most important drivers for his/her success and you’ll find that “my ability to hire the best people in my teams” is one of them.

With the above in mind these 4 observations are striking: (a) in business schools, there is zero to none academic training in “hiring people”, (b) almost no companies train their managers profoundly on this skill, (c) Tasks around “hiring people”, like job interviews, make up for a large part of a business leader’s day to day agenda, especially in more senior career stages, and (d) the academic state-of-the art knowledge on what is good practice has multiple extreme gaps with what happens in everyday business life. For instance, many organisations still base selection decisions on invalid and unreliable selection methods, thus making a bad-informed hiring decision.

In this course we will take two perspectives and related learning goals. First, you as a hiring manager: boosting your ability to make effective hiring decisions yourself. Second, you as a business leader: enhancing your ability to contribute strategically to the talent-acquisition goals of others in an organization.

In order to achieve these goals, this course will provide insights in the fundamentals of the talent acquisition process, how to effectively acquire/match talent to business needs and modern-day talent acquisition/recruitment/selection methods. The course engages students through a combination of lectures, practical case studies, debates, exercises and discussions. 

Course Coordinator: Dr B. Dietz

Negotiations are everywhere. Employers and employees negotiate over a variety of matters such as remuneration packages, performance measures, and which tasks have to be performed. Prices of commodities (such as oil, copper and computer chips) are not only determined in markets, but also negotiated beforehand amongst the concerned parties and written in detailed contracts. Mergers and acquisitions require negotiations over when the merger will start, the price at which the transaction is to take place, who will be the new CEO, and the location of headquarters. Government policy is typically the outcome of negotiations amongst cabinet ministers. Countries negotiate about trade agreements, travel conditions, immigration, and nuclear disarmament.

There are many possibilities to create value by exchange. However, the negotiation process between the involved parties may fail to establish a mutually favorable outcome. This course highlights the determinants of successful negotiation and its alternatives. What variables determine the outcome of negotiations such as those mentioned above? How can one negotiate a better deal (such as a wage increase) from one’s employer? What determines whether parties will strike an agreement quickly so as to minimize the loss of delay. What strategies should one adopt to maximize the negotiated sale price of one’s house? When is it attractive to be unpredictable in bargaining, and how to deal with it? When is the outcome of a negotiation process indeterminate, and how to resolve it? How to characterize bargaining power, and what strategies can help improve one’s bargaining power? Are there superior alternatives to bargaining?

This course develops the game theoretic approach in order to address the above and many other questions concerning negotiations in a unifying way. This allows to address

  • Multi-person interactions.
  • Asymmetric information;
  • Beliefs;
  • Bargaining power;
  • Superior alternatives to negotiation.

Taught by Prof. G. Hendrikse and Dr S. Isaakyan.​​​​​​​

There is a very big contrast between the proportion of business school alumni that work in sales - which is high - and the proportion of business schools offering a sales-related course in the curriculum – which is extremely low -. This is problematic because today’s world of sales more than ever requires professionals with an academic understanding of the field. Key trends like the knowledge intensity of sales work, and the shift towards a service economy have made the complexity of the sales environment higher than ever. Also, without a sale, it is impossible to run a business. Thus, sales is an essential element of management.

In this course we will focus first on salespeople, and start with the question: “what makes a salesperson effective?” Next, we’ll move the analyses towards the sales team level and will zoom in on leadership. The central goal is to understand how sales leaders can best manage salespeople. We will analyze what is unique to the management and leadership of salespeople, and discuss how to cope with this. Research-driven insights will form the foundation of the course, complemented with cases from modern-day business practice.

Taught by Dr. H.M.S Dietz.

In modern organizations, employees are continuously expected to learn and improve themselves to cope with frequent changes. Leadership skill is one of the core aspects to develop for career advancement. The aim of this course is to establish a solid foundation of the key principles of leadership development based in the state of the science. The focus will be on both developing your own leadership potential and your ability to develop other’s leadership.

Together we will reflect on insights from leadership research, explore different approaches to leadership development such as 360-degree feedback, coaching, mentoring, and learning from experience. There will also be debates on “hot” topics in the field. For example, is adventure-based/outdoor training effective? Does mindfulness training help leadership development? Is online coaching going to work?

You are expected to actively participate during the lectures both in discussions and through in-class exercises. In addition to active in-class participation, you are expected to complete a number of assignments outside of the classroom, both individually and in small groups. There are also weekly short quizzes to consolidate and provide feedback to your learning. 

Taught by C. Zhou

The generalist elective track of the MSc HRM allows you to fully customise your path through the electives. You choose at least two electives from the full list of electives and one other which can be from the MSc HRM or from another programme. This means that you do not need to specialise yet and can continue your broad education to understand more about people and change in organisations.

Example future careers for students taking this track:

  • Agile specialist  
  • Business analyst
  • Business consultant
  • Consultant
  • HR analyst
  • HR business partner
  • Learning & development specialist
  • Organization design analyst
  • Process manager
  • Program manager
  • Recruitment specialist
  • Reward analyst

Courses included in this track include (you choose two or three):

The list of skills necessary for working in any organisational environment is long. In this course, we will use the method of process consultation to pay attention to how people can advise.  This will result in increased communication, advisory and coaching skills.

This course focuses on how students communicate and react to other people in different contexts. The course is designed to enable the students to build and develop their advisory skills and to increase knowledge of the concepts behind them, so as to widen the choice of possible actions in a given situation and to develop the understanding of the strengths and weakness of their advisory skills. By the end of the course we will have provided the students with an opportunity to learn about and practice by understanding and diagnosing contexts and give advice. Guests, consultants, trainers and managers can also provide lectures.

Taught by Dr M.J. Flory.

Management Consulting is for many business students a challenging, yet rewarding profession. Rivalry within the industry is intense and client demands and expectations are high. Are you up for the challenge of becoming a successful management consultant? And what would you have to learn still, to kick-start a possible career in this competitive industry?

Consultants are important agents of organisational change, applying and transferring knowledge about business problems to advice and - increasingly - to assist managers to deal with such problems. Many business students will act as or deal with consultants sometime in their professional life. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the consulting practice, the consulting industry and to develop your cognitive skills. This is done by explaining concepts and through close interaction and collaboration with professional consultants.

During class, you will get to take responsibility for designing effective lectures in co-creation with your professor, professional consultants or specialist from the field as well as your fellow students. You will interact with experienced professionals, and guide a learning-process in which you and your fellow students learn the essentials that may help pursue a career in consulting. Amongst other things, in this class we discuss the need and role of management consultants, how management consultants deliver their services and how consultancies organize ethical and sustainable services for their clients.

Taught by Dr B. Koene and J. van Werkhoven.

Leaders are key players in organizational functioning because they critically affect the people they work with—both inside and outside of their organization. Leaders are in a unique position to mobilise employees to excel and contribute to the organisation’s mission and vision. At the same time, however, they may also be a primary source of conflict and demotivation. Understanding what makes for high performance leadership as well as where leadership can go wrong, therefore, is of critical importance to any aspiring leader; and in particular for HR professionals who may come to take the lead of the HR organization, as well as facilitate the process of leadership in their organization.

In this course, we address one key question: “what makes an effective leader?” from a range of different theoretical perspectives (e.g., social identity, visionary leadership) and cast in the context of contemporary workplace trends (e.g., demographic change, digitization). Through a sequence of readings, lectures, cases, and experiential exercises, students learn to understand and apply state-of-the-art leadership theories, analyse and evaluate the determinants of leadership successes and failures, as well as apply these learnings to make recommendations for real-world leadership challenges.

Taught by Dr T. Davidson.

This course will provide insights into the complex topic of diversity in organizations and will examine how diversity can effectively be managed in organizations. At the end of the course, students understand the core diversity theories and empirical research insights, can critically evaluate the operation and effects of diversity across individual, team, and organizational levels, and apply their learnings to real-world diversity challenges by identifying how human resource management (HRM) can contribute to the effective management of diversity in organizations. 

Taught by Dr A. Burmeister.

Incentives are what drive modern organizations, and employees tend to respond strongly to them. Well-designed incentives encourage employees to use their abilities and knowledge in the firm’s interests. They serve also an important role in recruitment in order to attract the right people to join and stay with the enterprise. Organizations have to address therefore their internal dynamics and external market environment simultaneously in order to create value.

Organizations are not only in markets, but also an alternative to markets. They tend to have characteristics that set them apart from markets, such as employees supplying a subset of their liberties to management, specific human capital, long term relationships, and various possibilities to do more (make better decisions) than any single individual. These features raise issues regarding the determinants of well-functioning organizations, such as ‘Who decides?’ (the allocation of authority, formal versus real authority, access; relational contracts; ratification and monitoring in decision control, and initiation and implementation in decision management; task design; conflict resolution; enforcement mechanisms; talent allocation across hierarchical positions; incompatible languages and communication failures; rigid cultures, …) and ‘Benefits and Costs’ (short-termism, hard versus soft information, vested interests in payment schemes; hiring decisions; …). They will be characterized as motivation problems (employees’ and organization’s interests differ), alignment challenges (lack of coordination across departments), and bounded cognition problems (lack of the necessary information to do so). Successful organizations address them in order to develop and implement policies to create value.

Taught by Prof. G. Hendrikse.

Parties in an exchange have to come to an agreement in order to create value. However, the negotiation process may fail to establish a mutually favorable outcome. This course highlights the determinants of a successful negotiation and its alternatives. It is done by developing a unifying framework, which allows to address

  • Multi-person interactions;
  • Asymmetric information;
  • Communication and beliefs;
  • Renegotiation and Coordination;
  • Bargaining power;
  • Facilitating practices.

Taught by M. Rishani, MSc., Dr J.P.J.M. Essers.

In this course we introduce participants to the process of organizational development and change, with a particular focus on the role of HR Management in interaction with line management and consultants as professional facilitators of these processes. The course involves six interactive lecture/workshops with discussions of the required readings, presentation of team-assignments, cases and exercises. Individual and team preparation for the meetings is required through preparatory assignments. The course aims to enhance participants' insight in processes of organizational change and development, and examines both formal and informal aspects of organizational functioning. In the weekly meetings, required readings are discussed and student teams present short assignments directly related to the topic of the specific meeting, aimed at understanding and gaining personal ownership of the presented insights. Examples of topics are: experiencing change, developing organizations, the role of the change agent, power and politics, resistance to change, change dynamics, institutional change, organizational learning, management and employee attitudes, strategies for change and change design. We study these phenomena and investigate the possible change management roles for HRM and other actors in the process of change (diagnosing the situation, recognizing development tendencies, designing and facilitating effective and responsible processes of development and change).

Taught by Dr B.A.S. Koene

Ask any business leader to mention the most important drivers for his/her success and you’ll find that “my ability to hire the best people in my teams” is one of them.

With the above in mind these 4 observations are striking: (a) in business schools, there is zero to none academic training in “hiring people”, (b) almost no companies train their managers profoundly on this skill, (c) Tasks around “hiring people”, like job interviews, make up for a large part of a business leader’s day to day agenda, especially in more senior career stages, and (d) the academic state-of-the art knowledge on what is good practice has multiple extreme gaps with what happens in everyday business life. For instance, many organisations still base selection decisions on invalid and unreliable selection methods, thus making a bad-informed hiring decision.

In this course we will take two perspectives and related learning goals. First, you as a hiring manager: boosting your ability to make effective hiring decisions yourself. Second, you as a business leader: enhancing your ability to contribute strategically to the talent-acquisition goals of others in an organization.

In order to achieve these goals, this course will provide insights in the fundamentals of the talent acquisition process, how to effectively acquire/match talent to business needs and modern-day talent acquisition/recruitment/selection methods. The course engages students through a combination of lectures, practical case studies, debates, exercises and discussions.    

Course Coordinator: Dr B. Dietz.

There is a very big contrast between the proportion of business school alumni that work in sales - which is high - and the proportion of business schools offering a sales-related course in the curriculum – which is extremely low -. This is problematic because today’s world of sales more than ever requires professionals with an academic understanding of the field. Key trends like the knowledge intensity of sales work, and the shift towards a service economy have made the complexity of the sales environment higher than ever. Also, without a sale, it is impossible to run a business. Thus, sales is an essential element of management.

In this course we will focus first on salespeople, and start with the question: “what makes a salesperson effective?” Next, we’ll move the analyses towards the sales team level and will zoom in on leadership. The central goal is to understand how sales leaders can best manage salespeople. We will analyze what is unique to the management and leadership of salespeople, and discuss how to cope with this. Research-driven insights will form the foundation of the course, complemented with cases from modern-day business practice.

Taught by Dr. H.M.S Dietz.

In modern organizations, employees are continuously expected to learn and improve themselves to cope with frequent changes. Leadership skill is one of the core aspects to develop for career advancement. The aim of this course is to establish a solid foundation of the key principles of leadership development based in the state of the science. The focus will be on both developing your own leadership potential and your ability to develop other’s leadership.

Together we will reflect on insights from leadership research, explore different approaches to leadership development such as 360-degree feedback, coaching, mentoring, and learning from experience. There will also be debates on “hot” topics in the field. For example, is adventure-based/outdoor training effective? Does mindfulness training help leadership development? Is online coaching going to work?

You are expected to actively participate during the lectures both in discussions and through in-class exercises. In addition to active in-class participation, you are expected to complete a number of assignments outside of the classroom, both individually and in small groups. There are also weekly short quizzes to consolidate and provide feedback to your learning. 

Taught by C. Zhou

Contents, course description

Organisations are constantly faced with external pressures to change their policies and practices – voiced by various stakeholders in their environment. Some of these pressures – so-called institutional pressures – will drive an organisation to become more similar to other organisations and adhere to state-of-the-art ways of doing things. Other pressures – competitive pressures – will instead drive an organisation to become more different from other organisations and develop new ways of doing things. And yet other pressures – normative pressures – will drive an organisation to position itself with respect to the moral order of society. Many organisational change programs – such as BPE, TQM, ERP implementations, innovation management programmes, mergers and acquisitions, sustainability standards, CSR programmes, and others – are the result of organisations’ efforts to deal with such manifold pressures from their environment.

How, under these conditions, should leaders steer an organisation’s development and change? Doing so raises difficult questions for leaders. How can their organisation walk the tightrope of adhering to established ways of doing things whilst also being distinct from their competitors? How much should their organisation change to conform with its environment? And how much should it rather change in opposition to its environment? And how may it even become a force for change within its environment, changing not only itself but also other organisations?

This course addresses these questions and in doing so develops a bird’s-eye-view of organisational responses to pressures for change, conceptualizing the organisation as embedded into different environments. It will integrate core theoretical concepts, including from institutional theory and strategic management, to help you understand how organisations respond to external pressures through changing their policies and practices.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain how organisations are embedded in their environment and how external pressures for change are caused
  2. Evaluate different organisational responses to environmental pressures
  3. Critically evaluate organisations’ ability to respond positively to pressures for change and themselves become a force for positive change in society
  4. Develop theoretically sound real-life recommendations for responses to external pressures

This course offers students the opportunity to conduct an internship on a topic of their own interest. An internship can help students to apply their theoretical knowledge as well as develop their professional attitude including skills such as organizing, planning, analyzing data and professionals collaboration with coworkers.

This course offers internships via two possible tracks; a practice-based and a research-based track. Students are themselves responsible for finding a practice-based internship, while we can place students interested in a research-based internship on an ongoing project of faculty. This can include a project that is offered by staff working on issues in human resources management, organizational change, organization theory and/or organizational behavior.

The duration of the internship is at least equivalent to 5-6 weeks full-time work, but can also be spread over a longer period of time or be conducted on a part-time basis. The research-based internship will most likely be part-time and the timeframe is determined in consultation with the staff. The planning of the practice-based internship depends on the organization involved. 

Course starts in Block 3 with one plenary session and ends in Block 5 with a final presentation session.

  

This course prepares students for the thesis trajectory that starts in January. The course consists of plenary sessions that are a combination of lecture and workshop. The first two lectures regard general topics about research, research questions and literature review. After these two joint sessions, students join either a qualitative or a quantitative research track for which three/four sessions will follow. In these tracks students are taught a more specialized understanding of either qualitative or quantitative research.

Assessment will have a mixed form and depending on the societal situation teaching will be done online or in a blended form.

Taught by M. Rishani.

Note regarding taking courses if you are not an RSM master student: RSM does not offer the possibility for non-RSM students (master or otherwise) to take RSM MSc courses outside of official exchange partnerships or other inter-faculty agreements. If you are interested in learning more about corporate social responsibility, sustainability, or business ethics, please refer to our Open Programmes section.

For more information on all international opportunities offered at RSM, visit the website of our International Office.

Learn more

Why this programme?

Factsheet

Internship

International exchange

Faculty

Your Future Career

The aim of ‘Your Future Career’ is to prepare RSM students at an early stage in their master's for their careers.

The online modules will help you make crucial steps towards the most suitable career step, whether an internship or a job.

To pass the course, you need to gain a minimum number of points within a few months. You can decide if you want to reflect on your interests and motivations, develop knowledge of the job market, receive peer feedback on application materials, learn to love networking, or attend an interactive alumni career panel or workshop.

See this page for more details.

 

This course is overseen and guided by Dr Maciej Szymanowski and Lisanne Keir

 

 

 

Career Opportunities

MSc alumnus story Human Resource Management

An alumnus talks about RSM’s MSc in Human Resource Management

MSc recruiter HRM story

A recruiter talks about RSM’s MSc in Human Resource Management

International labour market research shows that there is a growing need for HR professionals at all levels, and the strategic impact of the HR function within businesses is increasing. 

RSM’s MSc in Human Resource Management graduates start their careers equipped with this coveted area of expertise. Potential roles include management/HRM consultants, HR professionals, business analysts and management development professionals. 

Many multinational organisations such as Shell, Unilever and General Electric mention HRM explicitly as a required discipline for entry-level careers in their recruiting process.

Examples of positions taken up by our graduates: 

  • Agile specialist  

  • Business consultant

  • HR business partner

  • Organization design analyst

  • Recruitment specialist

  • Reward analyst

Non-EEA nationals who have earned a diploma from a higher education institute in the Netherlands can apply for a special residence permit called the orientation year after completing their studies. The 'Orientation Year for Graduates Seeking Employment' is a residence permit aimed at retaining foreign talent for the Dutch labour market. During this orientation year you are free to work without a work permit. Participants who find a job during this period can change their orientation year into a residence permit for Highly Skilled Migrants under more favourable terms.

For the most up-to-date information please visit the website of the Nuffic.

Career progress

Many students find positions within multinational firms and organisations, partially thanks to relationships they have developed with representatives from the world of business – as well as peers – during the programme’s corporate and other networking events. Students applying for jobs in their home countries are equipped with knowledge and skills to take with them.

Find the Employment Factsheet for your MSc programme here.

View LinkedIn profiles of our graduates

You can read more about our graduates and their career progress from their public LinkedIn profiles.

Tip: you can see more of our graduates’ profile information if you are not signed in to your LinkedIn account. Sign out of LinkedIn, then click the links.

Good to know

Career Centre

Alumni networks

MSc employment report

Vacancies for HRM students

Studying at RSM

Msc HRM student story

A student on the RSM MSc in Human Resource Management programme

The RSM Experience

Education for life

Studying at RSM will be a life-changing experience. Your master degree will prepare you for a fulfilling professional life as a capable, self-assured individual. It will make you valuable to business and attractive to employers because it teaches you skills that make the most of your innovative mind. You will be challenged in and outside of the classroom, and you will gain an education based on the latest developments in business. Your master degree from RSM will include RSM’s promise of life-long learning, and membership of the more than 40,000-strong alumni network that is present in more than 110 countries which hosts activities and events all over the world.

Open intellectual culture

Your education at RSM is valuable. You will learn from academics who produce the highest quality research and the most innovative management thinking. In the classroom, sharing and questioning opinions is encouraged – yours and those of your fellow students, as well as the professors’. Many of RSM’s faculty members are young and passionate professors and researchers with outstanding academic credentials. Their work is published in top international management journals.

Engaging environment

Professors’ doors are always open for students who have questions, projects or ideas. Depending on the study programme, students have different opportunities to tailor their programme. This can, for example, take the form of a minors course, an internship, an exchange at one of over 160 partner schools worldwide, elective choices, the participation in a consulting project with a company or public sector organisation, or a thesis project in their specific area of interest. RSM’s strong links with local and international businesses and organisations offer opportunities for practical projects and real-life collaborations.

Rotterdam, a future-oriented city

Living and studying in Rotterdam has never been better. Rotterdam is home to one of the largest and busiest ports in the world and many multinational companies have their headquarters here. The city is famous for its stunning modern architecture, such as the Centraal Station or its covered food market, the Markthal. At the same time, the city authorities are forward-thinking in improving its liveability. There’s no shortage of restaurants, museums and theatres, yet Rotterdam is still an extremely student-friendly city with plenty of affordable student housing, and a bustling nightlife that includes events organised by students associations.

Find out more about life in the city of Rotterdam.

RSM Master Students

Talk to a student ambassador!

Learn more about student life

More information

Master Study Club

Explore the campus

Life in the city

Coming from abroad

Fees & Scholarships

The combination of affordable tuition fees and living costs together with quality education and an excellent global reputation make a Masters degree at RSM a clever investment.

Tuition fees 

The 2023-2024 tuition fee for the MSc programmes is approximately €21,500 for non-EEA students. The Dutch government contributes towards this cost for students who hold a nationality from a country belonging to the European Economic Area(EEA). These students therefore only pay the statutory fee (€2,209 in 2022-2023, 2023/2024 is still tbd).  

For EEA nationals who have already completed a master in the Netherlands (and obtained the diploma) the tuition fee for a 2nd master is approximately €12,600.

The MSc International Management - CEMS (18 months) is a longer programme, for which the tuition fee will have to be paid for the duration of the programme. The expected tuition fee for the 18-month MSc International Management - CEMS programme is approximately €32,250 for non-EEA students and was approximately €3,314 for EEA students in 2022/2023 (2023/2024 is still tbd). 

Please note that all these tuition fee tariffs are subject to change.

Scholarships

The number of scholarships is limited and mainly merit based. If a scholarship covers only the tuition fees, be aware that you need to finance your own living expenses (rent, food and insurances) for the duration of your studies. RSM does not offer scholarships for the pre-master programme. We do however offer a maximum of 2 scholarships per academic year to RSM pre-master students enrolling in an MSc programme.

Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) offers multiple scholarships to prospective students from non-EEA countries who are not entitled to pay the EEA tuition fee, provided their grades are considered ‘excellent’. RSM also offers one scholarship, the Erasmus Trustfonds Scholarship, to students from EEA countries. 

Besides scholarships awarded by RSM, there are also scholarships awarded by the Dutch government or other organisations that are available if you meet certain criteria such as nationality, age, etc We have listed some of them below but we encourage you to use resources such as Grantfinder or the Scholarship Portal to find additional scholarships.

Scholarship tips

  • Contact the Ministry for Higher Education in your home country to see whether there are scholarship options.
  • We have virtual information session covering all you need to know about scholarships and financial aid. Watch it here.

For students from the Netherlands or the EU/EEA, it may be possible to apply for limited funding towards payment of your tuition fees. Find out whether you meet the nationality and age requirements and read more information about the application process here.

Master Application Handling fee

After having filled in all of the necessary application information on the Online Application Form (OLAF) and uploaded the required documents, applicants with a degree obtained outside the Netherlands will be asked to pay a non-refundable €100 handling fee. This fee can be paid online via the Erasmus Payment System which uses either iDEAL (for those with a Dutch bank account) or PayPal (which can be linked to any bank account or credit card worldwide). It is important that applicants complete the payment process as indicated, otherwise the system cannot register the payment.

Additional programme related expenses

The additional expenses in addition to tuition and general living costs (see below) vary per programme and may include:

  • Study materials such as books, readers and business cases
  • Costs involved in kick-off meetings
  • Costs related to travel, international excursions and compulsory exchange semesters or internships abroad

Admission & Application

The application for all programmes starting September 2022 are closed. The application for September 2023 will open 1 October.

Immigration

Important immigration information for NON EU/EEA Full-time BScIBA and MSc students

Depending on your nationality, you might need an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit for the Netherlands, issued by the Dutch Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND).  Students can only apply for an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit through the RSM/ Erasmus University. Only with a valid Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit you are allowed to study at RSM/ Erasmus University.

Needless to say that RSM/ Erasmus University is not the institution that determines the requirements. The IND is the official governmental body that sets the rules and procedures.

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their offer and hold a passport from an EU/EEA country do not need to apply for an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit.

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their conditional or unconditional offer and have a nationality and hold a passport of one of the following countries: Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, South Korea, USA or Vatican State. 

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their conditional or unconditional offer, have a nationality and hold a passport of one of the countries mentioned in Group III and IV. This procedure also applies to students with a Surinamese nationality.

Note for Chinese students
Obtain a Nuffic Certificate : 
All Chinese students (with the exception of students from Hong Kong, Taiwan and students with a British Overseas Nationality) must register with EP-Nuffic for a ‘Nuffic Certificate’ before their immigration application can be started. The certificate is a document providing an assessment of your English language proficiency and of the authenticity of your educational degrees and diplomas. For more information, see the Nuffic website

Validity Entry Visa
An Entry Visa is valid for 90 days (counted from the day that you pick up your Entry Visa).

Validity Residence Permit 
A Residence Permit is valid for the duration of your study plus three extra months. This means that you do not have to apply for an extension after one year.

I already have a Residence Permit for another EU/EEA Country

NON-EU/EEA students holding a (permanent or temporary) valid Residence Permit (e.g. for study purposes) for another EU/EEA Country no longer need to apply for an Entry Visa for the Netherlands. For these students, the procedure for a Residence Permit application applies. A copy of the EU/EEA-Residence Permit must be uploaded in your application. The Residence Permit must be valid at the time of the application, and still be valid when the student collects his/her Residence Permit in the Netherlands.

I already have a Residence Permit for the Netherlands

NON-EU/EEA students holding already a Residence Permit for the Netherlands (e.g. for study purposes, stay with partner or family, employment), need to apply for Switching InstitutionsChange of Purpose or an Extension of your Residence Permit. Requests can be sent after being completely registered (onwards September 1st) to EUR International Office: immigration@eur.nl or 3 months prior to the expiration of your permit.

The Financial Requirements (determined by the IND)

Before your immigration application is sent to the IND, you are required to prove that you have sufficient financial means to cover your study (only for the first year of your study)

  1. the Tuition Fee (BSc IBA €9,600.-, MSc €18,700.-;
  2. the Immigration Fee (€ 192.-)
  3. the Costs of Living for 12 months (€11,400.-: €950.- for every month of your stay in the Netherlands)

Note: it is not possible to pay your tuition fee in instalments

Contact details for the immigration application

Your main point of contact for the immigration application at RSM/ Erasmus University is Ms. Joyce Maliepaard.

Once you have a conditional or unconditional offer you receive the ‘Immigration application process’ (from mid March on). The guidelines explains the procedure to successfully process your application. After having received the information you will be registered in student registration system ‘Osiris Zaak’ (‘Osiris Zaak’ opens in  April).

After your registration in 'Osiris Zaak' your main point of contact is EUR Internatinonal Office (immigration@eur.nl). The immigration documents and invoice for the payment of the fees will be sent to you in 5 working days

Deadline for MSc students
The deadline for uploading your immigration application documents and your proof of payment in 'Osiris Zaak' is: JUNE 15th. If this deadline is not feasible for you, please send an email to visabscmsc@rsm.nl

Deadline for BScIBA students
The deadline for uploading your immigration application documents and your proof of payment in 'Osiris Zaak' is: JUNE 15th. If this deadline is not feasible for you, please send an email to visabscmsc@rsm.nl

Release date: March 2021

Housing

Looking for housing in Rotterdam? (MSc)

Housing information for full-time RSM students coming to Rotterdam

Although a complete and useful overview of housing information for International Students can be found on the housing pages of the Erasmus University, the information below especially applies to RSM’s first year BScIBA and MSc students coming from abroad. Arranging your stay

As in many major European cities, the demand for reasonably priced housing in Rotterdam is very high. Therefore, make it your number one priority and start searching immediately after being conditionally or unconditionally admitted to our BScIBA or one of the MSc programmes. As campus housing is limited, you may have to look for a room on the private market or seek other alternatives.

The ‘Short Stay Accommodations’ of RSM is run by the housing corporation SSH Student Housing (SSH), specialized in letting furnished accommodation.
For our first year BScIBA and MSc students coming from abroad, we reserve a range of furnished accommodations. Students can only apply for ‘Short Stay Accommodations’ for the first 12 months of their study (it is not possible to rent a room for less than 12 months). After 12 months you have to find accommodation by yourself. The SSH Accommodation is not available for partners or family of the student. 

Important: This message applies to all the students who have registered for the SSH housing for the 2022 academic year!

Please note that RSM has only 130 rooms to be divided among BSc and MSc students. A fair distribution will be made under the students. As SSH housing is limited, not every registration can be approved. Please be patient and waiting any approval. To increase your chances we strongly advice you to look for more housing possibilities here.

It is not possible to correspond about the result, neither by email nor by telephone

Available SSH housing/accommodation for BScIBA & MSc students
The SSH has four dorms you can choose from: one on-campus (Hatta Building) and three off-campus, only 15 minutes walking from the university (D'Blaauwe MolenOverhoningen and Erasmus International House). All rooms/apartments are fully fitted and furnished (not self-contained) and located at Struisenburgdwarsstraat in the district of Kralingen, This district offers everything that a student needs: the Erasmus University, little shops and typical student pubs are around the corner. The centre of Rotterdam and the Kralingse Bos are just a stone’s throw away. In most cases you have communal cooking facilities and sanitary fitting. Accommodations can not be visited in advance, but descriptions of the different buildings are available on the SSH website. Please not that rental prices are re-indexed every year.

When am I eligible to register for a room at the SSH ?
You can register for a room once you have been conditionally or unconditionally admitted to the first year BScIBA programme or one of the MSc programmes.

When and how can I register for a room at the SSH?

BScIBA students:

 

  • Tuesday 12 April 2022 at 12 PM: Start registration
  • Tuesday 21 April 2022 at 12 PM: Start booking

IMPORTANT NOTE: The SSH start the registration for all Bachelor students (Erasmus University students) on April 12th, while the BScIBA students get the outcome onwards April 15th. This means that RSM start approving your registration at the earliest on Thursday 21 April. The date of registration for the MSc students has been changed: 

MSc students:

 

Go to SHH*  and fill in:
City:                                          Rotterdam
Your educational institution:     Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR)
Type of Resident:                     EUR Full Year Student (15 August 2022 - 31 July 2023) 
                                                    

When and how can I reserve a room at the SSH?
You can reserve a room and only see all the available rooms once your registration has been approved by the RSM. The approval proces for BScIBA students takes place onwards 19 April and for the MSc students on 12 May.

For BSc students: select and reserve a room      
Log in to My SSH to reserve a room within 7 days*:
* If you have not selected a room within 7 days, your application will be set automatically to “not approved”. After this period you can no longer reserve accommodation via SSH (to give other students also a fair chance to apply for accommodation). 

SSH will handle the whole process – from making a room reservation to payments. For more information about the Terms and Conditions, the Rental Guide and the FAQ’s, please visit the site www.sshxl.nl/en. Any questions can be addressed to: Rotterdam@sshxl.nl

Xior Building is a student building right next to the campus of the RSM/ Erasmus University. This 8th floor building upholds 280 studio apartments with all private bathroom and kitchen facilities.

Registration & Reservation opens on:

  • Wednesday 11 May 2022 at 12.00 PM
  • Fixed rental period: 19 August 2022 – 7 August 2022

RSM is not in charge for the rental of these rooms and is only for students coming from abroad. Your registration will be checked by the Real Estate Services Department of the Erasmus University. All your questions can be addressed to rotterdam@xior.nl 

 

The RSM/Erasmus University has a partnership with the companies SSH, XIOR, The Cohesion Cobana, Roomplaza and the Student Hotel. Additional information on the below mentioned housing providers, and many more, are listed on the Erasmus University Housing pages.

International Student Housing Rooms (ISHR)
Is a private initiative to manage shared living properties in The Netherlands. It was founded by former students of Erasmus University Rotterdam, who now work in the financial industry. ISHR is not an intermediary. It is a landlord-owned operating platform, developed based on lessons learned from a decade of interactions between international students and Dutch private landlords.The EUR has agreed on a partnership with ISHR and we have reserved around 40 flat share rooms exclusively for our first year International Bachelor or Master students.

Registration starts on:
Monday 2 May 2022 at 12 PM. Fixed rental period: 10 August 2022 - 31 July 2023

The Cohesion Cobana 
Located in Katendrecht, Rotterdam. Katendrecht is a vibrant part of Rotterdam with a central location. The FIZZ Cobana has a variety of Friends apartments. This unique concept is a great way to share living space of your apartment, but still have all the privacy you want with your own bedroom. As a student of the Erasmus you will have a possibility to live with other Erasmus students in a Friends apartment. It’s a perfect blend of privacy and sociability, whenever you want it. The Erasmus University has reserved for its International students 40 rooms. 
How to register? Please find here all the information.

RoomPlaza 
Offers students the possibility to rent a flat with a group of like-minded people. They have 80 rooms for BSc and MSc students. You can apply as an existing group or use your find-a-flat mate tool to form your own. RoomPlaza has a safe booking process with a 100% guarantee of avoiding scams by fake accommodation providers. How to register? Please find here all the information.

The Student Hotel
A hotel located in Kralingen Rotterdam which offers fully furnished rooms with a private bathroom, shared or private kitchen, WiFi, flat screen TV. Included in the price is a bike, use of the gym, study rooms, lounges and game rooms, 24-hour reception, laundry room and a restaurant/bar 
How to book a room? Please find here all the information. 

Updated: 2 May 2022

 

Hostels in Rotterdam

Some suggestions:

Boat Hotel – a short stay apartment on a historical ship in the centre of Rotterdam.

King Kong Hostel - a very cool hostel that blends industrial design with 21st century contemporary art. It has a superb location in the beginning of Witte de Wittestraat which is in the heart of Rotterdam’s social scene and all the city’s best bars and restaurants are on your doorstep.

Hostel ROOM Rotterdam – located in Rotterdam’s historic Scheepvaartkwartier, near a beautiful little harbour. There are lots of good places for wining and dining in the area and close to the city’s main park.

Hostel Stayokay – this hostel is located in the city centre of Rotterdam in the striking cube houses. Next to Metro station “Blaak”.

As tenancy agreements are often only provided in Dutch (huurovereenkomst), we recommend you to view the additional information on this topic provided on the Erasmus University website.  There you can also find information on Dutch housing terms, and other information on how to arrange your stay and other useful tips, for example on how not to get scammed.

If you are a people-oriented person who loves to solve moral dilemmas and complex organisational issues about people and stakeholders, take this programme. I enjoy the small-scale classrooms and the space to ask questions and voice our opinions. Real life cases stimulate my thinking about applying theory into practice; I think that’s essential for entering the labour market.

Ekata Das (MSc HRM class of 2020)

Ekata Das MSc student graduate 2020

Is it right for me?

Do you picture yourself giving advice about organisational decision-making as an HR practitioner or management consultant? Can you see yourself creating positive change in management or leadership roles? 

The changing nature of organisations makes these roles critical to business success, and the increasing professionalism of HR is reflected in increasing salaries for HR managers.

This programme develops your practical skills while drawing on research evidence, so it’s a ‘hands-on’ experience with a focus on making evidence-based decisions. It is taught in a way that appeals to people who are comfortable using data, as well as to those who are not. 

Are you still in doubt?

Would you like extra information or support? We are here to help!

More to explore

Take a virtual tour across our campus

RSM campus

Will you lead or will you follow?

I Will