• Application deadline

    31 January

    This programme has a set deadline and a selective admissions process. The programme has a maximum capacity of 65 students.

  • Starting date

    August 2022 (week 34)

  • Format

    Full-time | 18 months

  • Credits

    90

  • Fee

    €2,209 (EEA)* | €20,700 (non-EEA) for the 2022/2023 academic year.

    * For EEA nationals who have already completed a master in the Netherlands (and obtained the diploma) the tuition fee for a 2nd master is €12,400.

  • Language

    English and minimum proven proficiency in at least two other languages

Are you keen to become a responsible business leader in a more open, sustainable and inclusive world? Prepare for your international management career in this top-ranked, highly inspiring environment. You’ll grow a strong academic foundation with a focus on practical applicability through skills seminars, an international internship, and a consultancy-like international business project.

  • 66% international students in programme
  • 89% of graduates employed within 3 months after graduation
  • Examples of your future job title: Management consultant, marketing manager, revenue analyst

What you will learn

From day 1 of the 18-month programme, you’ll be part of the global CEMS network. This means you can connect with inspiring classmates in your close-knit cohort and with many companies through social and career activities throughout the programme. No matter what area you’re interested in – strategy, consulting, entrepreneurship, or technology – there are always CEMS graduates who can boost your learning experience and remain very involved with the programme for current students. There’s also a lot of engaging and insightful debates in class because your classmates represent so many nationalities and cultures.

A diverse set of knowledge

Through core courses and exciting electives as part of the curriculum, for example finance, consumer behaviour, sustainability leadership, corporate communication, and people management.

Innovation Strategy

In the course Innovation Management, you’ll explore how to successfully analyse and implement an innovation strategy, and how to manage the innovation process.

Climate Change Strategy

And the Climate Change Strategy Roleplay course gives you critical insight into the key elements of climate change, climate policy, and their effects on the future of business and the planet.

To be part of the CEMS network

No matter what area you’re interested in, there are always CEMS graduates who can boost your learning experience and remain very involved with the programme for current students.

CEMS students in classroom setting

Programme highlights

  • Experience the “CEMS spirit”

    An active CEMS Club creating a close-knit, personal quality to the programme as you study and work with people who want to improve themselves and society at large.

  • Varied educational experience

    Including in-company projects, career events and panels, an exchange semester and an international internship.

  • Access to the CEMS network of prestigious business schools, corporate partners and alumni

    This gives you access to companies and inspire you to discover which career path suits you best.

  • Dual qualification

    MSc International Management from RSM, and the CEMS Master in Management certificate via the CEMS Alliance

  • Take electives from other RSM master programmes or while on exchange

    to expand your perspectives, and network in specific business areas.

  • Study in small interactive classes

    that encourage teamwork with other motivated, ambitious, internationally oriented future managers.

More about the programme

Curriculum

Dr Meir Shemla on teaching the CEMS / International Management master

A teacher's story

  • Fall MSc IM and CEMS course requirement in strategy for 7.5 EC (either at RSM or on CEMS exchange)
  • Spring MSc IM and CEMS course requirement in global leadership for 7.5 EC (either at RSM or on CEMS exchange)
  • For RSM students spending the Fall semester at RSM, two of the four following courses must be taken:
    1. BM-IM03CC Global Supply Chain Management 7.5 EC
    2. BM-IM06CC International Entrepreneurship 7.5 EC (this course may be taken for this requirement ONLY if it hasn't already been taken for the Fall strategy requirement)
    3. BM-IM09CC Innovation Management 7.5 EC
    4. BM-IM12CC Management Control 7.5 EC
  • For RSM students spending the Spring semester at RSM, two of the four following courses must be taken:
    1. BM-IM04CC Using Business Analytics and Machine Learning for New Products 7.5EC
    2. BM-IM11CC Corporate Venturing 7.5 EC
    3. BM-IM13CC International Corporate Finance 7.5 EC
    4. BM-IM14FE Climate Change Strategy Roleplay 7.5 EC
  • CEMS course requirement in hard skills for 5 EC (either at RSM or on CEMS exchange)

  View all core courses below:

Read below what the Autumn semester at the IM / CEMS master's looks like.

The block seminar is a one-week course within the CEMS programme that takes place at the beginning of Term 1 at all CEMS schools. Block Seminars bring together professors and students from various CEMS institutions. Subjects derive from different cultural and academic perspectives; many topics are not a part of the universities’ standard curricula. 

The Block Seminar is a mandatory element of the programme and accounts for 3 EC and students receive a letter grade for the Block Seminar in their CEMS curricular progress. For the MSc International Management curriculum, it is evaluated based on pass/fail. 

RSM offers two parallel Block Seminars in cooperation with CEMS social partner & RSM corporate partner, the European Space Agency. The first block seminar, The Entrepreneurial Challenge: Turning Technology into Business (TTB) focuses on developing a (non-space) business application of a European Space Agency (ESA) technology. It learns the students about entrepreneurship and developing new, viable businesses. The second block seminar is about strategy consulting and to support entrepreneurs with the development of their new business. 

Students are assigned to teams of 4-6 persons and as a team they work on a group assignment. 

For the module TTB, the assignment is to develop a viable business concept using space technology. The business concept needs to be presented at the end of the working week. For the module NVC, the assignment is to provide entrepreneurs with actionable recommendations how to improve their new business. These recommendations also need to be presented at the end of the week. 

The group project is a joint effort. This means that all team members should contribute equally and fully participate throughout the week. Lecturers, facilitators and experts will support and coach the students in their assignments during the week. The quality of the final work will be graded by the course lecturers in collaboration with an independent jury.  

Further details on the course organization and assignment will be provided on Canvas and during the first meeting. 

Taught by Dr G. Cross (TTB), Dr G. Criaco (NVC), N. Eldering (ESA), guest lecturers

This course will leverage academic articles, practical applications of theory, and cases to develop the students’ ability to analyze international strategy issues. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of core concepts through weekly quizzes and class discussion. They will end the course with a group project.  

We will focus on three core theories of international strategy: Industry-, Resource-, and Institution-based views. Individually, these theories provided the building blocks for international strategy. Porter (1980) introduced what we now call the industry-based view to help managers better understand competitive dynamics in industries. In the mid 80’s and early 90’s, the revival of resource-based approaches elaborating Penrose (1952) helped to explain how firms may develop capabilities and combine and leverage resources to gain sustained competitive advantages (Barney, 1991; Dierickx & Cool, 1989). And more recently, a group of scholars has been promoting the inclusion of an institution-based view to help explain the rules of game that may shape business and firm outcomes. Together, these theories create the basis for a strategy tripod. 

The strategy tripod helps managers to better understand four key questions (Peng et al., 2009): Why do firms differ? How do firms behave? What determines the scope of the firm? What determines the success and failure of firms around the globe? Each of these questions relates to firm performance, the fundamental focus of strategy practitioners and researchers and the core of our course. 

Review the course guide for more details.

Taught by Dr B. Pinkham.

Supply chain management (SCM) has emerged as one of the major areas for companies to gain a competitive edge. Managing supply chains is a complex and challenging task, due to current business trends of expanding product variety, short product life cycles, increasing outsourcing, globalization of business, and continuous advances in information technology. Supply chain management, as a natural successor to operations management, is a fundamental driver not only for further improving operations but also for strengthening the competitive position of firms. When a company faces the pressure of excessive inventories, degraded customer service, escalating costs and declining profits, or a poor return on assets, its supply chain is out of control. On the other hand, when a company moves into new markets or new technologies, it must have its supply chain prepared for new business challenges and opportunities. The course will introduce students to concepts and techniques related to the design, management and improvement of supply chains and supply chain operations.

The course focuses on a variet of challenging supply chain business situations.  For example, how different types of supply contracts can be used to design win-win solutions between buyer and supplier, how the benefits of information sharing can be estimated in the context of supply chain, and what supply chain strategies match with proliferating product variety. Other topics include, but are not limited to, inventory management, supply chain transportation and distribution network design, operational hedging and global supply chain risk management.

Review the course guide for more details.

Taught by Dr M. Pourakbar.

One manifestation of our globalizing world is the emergence of innovative start-ups that have a worldwide focus and sometimes resource base from inception. The international activities of these firms that have decided to go abroad almost directly after their creation, have received an increasing amount of attention over the past years; they are called born globals or international new ventures. In addition to small and medium-sized firms with incremental growth strategies, the focus in this course is on these dynamic start-up firms that make products and sell services that are ‘new to the world’, strive for scaling up their activities and seek international presence. These growth-oriented start-ups with global expansion strategies face a lot of uncertainty compared to established multinational companies with more traditional products and services: their novel products or services are unknown to the market, so is the effect of the product for the customer. Also, in bringing these niche products and services to the international market, young firms have limited resources and few complementary assets (they do not have deep pockets and needed additional start-up and growth financing).

In this course we will look how innovative start-ups and ambitious small firms mitigate the risks of starting-up, early growth and internationalization, and more specifically how they address and manage their country selection and market investigation choice(s), their entry mode strategies and international operations and capabilities. Other interesting characteristics of these international new ventures are the importance of the founders and the entrepreneurial team, their particular motives for international expansion, and the relevance of strategic partners and investors.

Increasingly entrepreneurship is seen as a promising approach aiming to solve complex social, environmental, and economic problems with innovative solutions. Here we deal with the overlaps between collaborative entrepreneurship, sustainable development and social venturing. This entrepreneurial collaboration may manifest itself through cross-actor participation within entrepreneurial processes, addressing sustainability issues by developing entrepreneurial solutions, and society-wide cooperation between different forms of entrepreneurship such as social entrepreneurship, sustainable entrepreneurship, and institutional entrepreneurship. Compared with commercial and independent entrepreneurship, social and collaborative entrepreneurship is characterized by the process of pursuing opportunities in pursuit of high social returns (cf. market leadership, or profit maximization). Instead of establishing a new venture to seize and commercialize opportunities, the social entrepreneur recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to make social change possible or realize a societal goal (e.g. the slow take-off of recycle stores in the Netherlands).

This Master course is for students who plan to become involved in new ventures and fast-growing and internationalizing firms, or high-impact social ventures in the near future (i.e. immediately after graduating) or at mid-career. Another reason to take this course is that some simply want to more as a future consultant to young companies or entrepreneurship support manager about the key entrepreneurial and managerial processes found in start-ups and fast-growing companies.

Review the course guide for more details.

Taught by Dr W. Hulsink.

Whether an organization innovates determines whether it survives. Take the iPhone for example, which disrupted the cell phone market and within a few years became the most successful smartphone company (Nokia sold its cell phone division to Microsoft in 2014 due to huge losses).

In this course you learn why companies struggle to innovate, how to successfully analyze and implement an innovation strategy, and you learn to manage the innovation process.

The course consists of two pillars (or ‘walls’) that enable a company to become innovative (Innovation Strategy and Organization Design) and the innovation process itself (see figure below). The innovation process contains how to generate, select, implement, protect, experiment, scale, and diffuse ideas. Consequently, this course will provide you the skills and knowledge to manage innovations.

Review the course guide for more details.

This course is taught by Dr H. Klapper​​​​​​​​​​​​​​. 

Management Control Systems (MCS) form the bridge between the organization’s strategy and its operations/services. Their purpose is to align managerial behaviour and decision making with organizational strategic goals. Although financial management tools are typically crucial  in an organization’s MCS, the design and use of a MCS does not only require an understanding of accounting techniques. It should also be based on a thorough understanding of how managerial behaviour is influenced by relevant control system elements, such as target setting, performance measurement and monetary incentives. Indeed, as the proper design of MCS is paramount for organizational performance, organizational failure can often be attributed to a poor design or implementation of the organization’s management control system. Past scandals such as the collapse of Enron and the recent crisis in the financial sector can be directly traced back to failures in MCS design. The emphasis of the course is on the analysis and understanding of the drivers of managerial (rational and irrational) decision making in complex organizations rather than on the application of accounting tools often associated with financial management.
 
The course strongly focuses on the managerial issues faced by CFOs of multinational companies. Meetings are case-based: students discuss (financial) management control topics in close relation to case studies of multinational companies. The assignments/tests will allow students to show their theoretical knowledge, but also their understanding of how to apply it to real-life case situations.

Review the course guide for more details.

This course is taught by Prof. Dr M. van Rinsum​​​​​​​.

All electives enable you to broaden your knowledge of a chosen field before starting work on your Master Thesis. 

CEMS electives cover a broad range of subjects, from strategic management to current issues in sustainability. Through your selection of electives, you gain either in-depth knowledge of a certain field, or a broader view across the entire international business landscape, depending on your preference for your future career: to apply for a specialist entry-level job, or to gain a broad foundation for a wide range of careers in management.

CEMS students may choose free electives from among the CEMS-accredited courses indicated here at the EUR online course guide.

Read below what the Spring semester at the IM / CEMS master's looks like.

The contact between individuals and organizations from different countries, cultures, and social groups has never been greater than in our time. In recent decades organizations have continuously globalized their operations, resulting in increasing frequency with which employees interact with colleagues and customers from different cultural backgrounds and ethnicities. At the same time, as a result of legal, social and economic shifts, workforce participation rates of women, minorities, and disabled people have dramatically grown, thus turning diversity into a strategic issue in organizations. Further, as executives operate around broader regions, global teams are formed to address the need to become globally competitive, and customers and suppliers operate across borders, the demands on global executives are ever growing. 

This course is designed to help participants develop a deeper understanding of the issues that confront global managers today, and to prepare them for leadership roles in international organizations. Through business cases, experiential exercises, and real-life examples, the course strives to explore knowledge in leading diverse people as well as in leading global organizations. Emphasis will be placed on gaining awareness for the role of culture in organizations and on developing skills to manage diversity.

Review the course guide​​​​​​​ for more details.

Taught by Dr M. Shemla​​​​​​​. 

Climate change is one of today’s most pressing issues, receiving international attention from political leaders, corporations, the media, advocacy groups, and the general public. In the future, it is likely to become even more pressing as the effects of climate change intensify resource competition, natural disasters, disease vectors, water and food scarcity, and refugee migration.

According to Sir Nicholas Stern, former chief economist of the World Bank, the impact of climate change is likely to change the international business environment dramatically. However, the business relevance of climate change is insufficiently understood by future decision makers in international management and society.

We believe that tomorrow’s business leaders should be educated on the key elements of climate change – the science, the evolving policy, and role of business. They can become an essential part of the solution, but only if equipped with a sound understanding of the challenges at hand and the processes by which new policies are constructed.

The Climate Change Strategy course and its Model United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) form an innovative educational approach to closing this knowledge gap. Our goal is to broaden students' understanding of climate change, climate policy, and their impacts on the future of business.

The course modules deal with the core issues of climate change and include a wide range of effective didactic tools and exercises. Students are given a deeper understanding of the background and consequences of climate change for business, and of corporate responses to it. Special emphasis is laid on international and national regulatory frameworks, and on emerging resource challenges and market opportunities. Furthermore, the course will provide students with an opportunity to develop a broad set of personal skills such as negotiation, forming strategy, research, public speaking and debating.

The 2022 edition of the course will be simultaneously offered at eight leading CEMS universities and culminates in a two-day UNFCCC simulation event at one of the business schools.

Students will be using the 2015 Paris Agreement created at COP21 and be simulating the upcoming COP27. Negotiations will seek to enhance the current Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of countries and work out details of how the new mechanisms and funds will function. The big challenge is how to improve the current commitments to be in line with the universally agreed target of limiting global temperature rise to ‘well-below 2 degrees’. Students will negotiate on issues such as mitigation of greenhouse gases (new voluntary targets, financing and compliance), adaptation to climate change (financing, climate change refugees, technology transfer), and market mechanisms (sustainable development mechanism, REDD+, aviation and shipping).

Students should attend and actively participate in the classes. Students are expected to engage in class discussions, ask questions of speakers, and demonstrate involvement with group exercises.

Review the course guide for more details.

Taught by Dr S.P. Kennedy.

The course is focused on using statistics and machine learning tools to solve problems in the area of new product development (NPD). This involves offline problems (e.g., how to design a new product, how to measure value creation) as well as online problems (how machine learning can be deployed to, in real time, assess consumers styles, recommend online products, and communicate with them in a personalized – but computer-mediated - way).

New product development is a marketing topic, and the lecturer is a marketing professor who has done extensive research on the use of machine learning in marketing. His research on machine learning methods for digital marketing will be extensively discussed and the quantitative methods he has published (such as morphing, machine-learning based assessment of cognitive styles, and reinforcement learning) will be taught in class.

Why is this course focused on new product development? Well, product innovation is consistently found to be one of the most important drivers for a firm’s success. More recently, the Internet has enabled products that are recommended and adapted to each consumer, but that requires the firms to be able to use analytics and machine learning.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a deep understanding on (1) the machine learning methods that are being used in the development and commercialization of new products, both digital and non-digital, and (2) the analytics and machine learning tools needed for customization and recommendation of digital products.

Review the course guide for more details.

This course is taught by Prof. Dr G. Liberali​​​​​​​​​​​​​​.

Over the past years, small firms and start-ups have started to play an increasingly important role in our economy. R&D spending by small firms has increased and many disruptive innovations have been conceived by new entrants to an industry, thereby posing a major threat to existing firms. In order to sustain their competitive advantage, it is important for large firms such as Shell, DSM, and KLM to tap into the knowledge of these start-ups and to invest in corporate venturing. Corporate venturing can be achieved in different ways, including: taking a minority position in outside businesses (corporate venture capital), building a new business as a stand-alone unit (spin-out), or building a new business inside the existing firm with a structure allowing for managerial autonomy and independence (corporate incubator or accelerator). This course will discuss strategies, organizational structures and implementation challenges of new ventures within an established corporation as well as options to leverage external partners outside the boundaries of the corporation within the process of new business development.

Review the course guide for more details.

This course is taught by Prof. Dr V.J.A. van de Vrande​​​​​​​.

Understanding the financial perspective on international business operations can unlock rich insights into business models, economic developments, and political decisions. While changes in currency values or interest rates appear to be abstract topics to most people, these developments have far-reaching implications for corporations and the potential to radically alter the business landscape of a country.

The course International Corporate Finance provides participants with the knowledge to understand the financial perspective of a firm that operates internationally. The goal of the course is to understand how firms are affected by international financial markets, how firms can manage risks from international operations, and how changes in financial markets are related to the development of an economy. These aspects are not only relevant for the finance department of a company, but also impact the strategic decision making of a firm, marketing strategies, and the supplier-side of a firm. As currencies constitute a major risk factor and information source for international operations and developments, this topic will receive special attention. By the end of the course, participants are able to apply finance theory to gain a deeper understanding of daily business news and global economic developments.

The course is highly interactive and employs a variety of didactic formats, including lectures, case studies, in-class exercises, and group presentations. As the focus of the course is on the application of finance theory, the course is suitable for participants with or without a strong background in finance. Participants without a finance background can find recommended online resources in the course manual to review basic financial concepts such discounting and time-value of money, as well as basic features of financial securities (stocks, bonds, and options).

Additional information about this course is available in the video Welcome to International Corporate Finance.

Review the course guide for more details.

This course is taught by Dr C.H.O. Schmitt.

The International Business Project (or IBP) constitutes an important (and mandatory) part of the Spring semester within the CEMS programme at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM). Over a period of approximately four months, you will work intensively on a consultancy project together with three/four other students, carried out for a company or institution. Both a university and a company coach supervise the project. The general aim of the project is to respond professionally and effectively to a real-world management problem and to learn from working together in multidisciplinary and culturally heterogeneous groups.

Most students will already be familiar with various business disciplines through course work; however, the interdisciplinary use of this knowledge and the capacity to translate it into practical solutions is often a new challenge. The business project permits students to combine theory and practice – they learn how to formulate a project proposal and relevant research questions, analyse problems, develop recommendations and propose solutions to the problem. In addition to providing hands-on experience on how to deal with a business problem, the course also offers a unique chance to learn about how teams function and to learn how to work effectively in teams. Therefore, the project incorporates leadership sessions that challenge students to deepen their understanding of the process of working in multidisciplinary and international teams.

All electives enable you to broaden your knowledge of a chosen field before starting work on your Master Thesis. 

CEMS electives cover a broad range of subjects, from strategic management to current issues in sustainability. Through your selection of electives, you may gain either in-depth knowledge of a certain field, or a broader view across the entire international business landscape, depending on your preference for your future career: to apply for a specialist entry-level job, or to gain a broad foundation for a wide range of careers in management.

CEMS students may choose free electives from among the CEMS-accredited courses indicated here at the EUR online course guide.

Read below what the thesis semester at the IM / CEMS master's looks like.

The Research Clinic constitutes the formal start of the MSc International Management thesis semester. Students must have completed the full first year of the MSc International Management/CEMS programme in order to advance to the research clinic and thesis semester. The seminar informs IM students about the following research issues: 

  • What makes good research compelling? 

  • How does one write an interesting and persuasive thesis? 

  • How does one formulate a challenging research question? 

  • What is an adequate research methodology to answer the central research question? 

The Research Clinic is structured around four plenary lectures that address the research issues stated above; in parallel, students work in small-scale highly interactive work groups applying these themes to their own research topic. Groups will typically consist of students sharing similar research topics. The output of this seminar is a research proposal for the Master thesis. 

All plenary sessions are interactive; students can expect to be asked questions, to make presentations, or to engage in discussion with other fellow students. The preceding implies that students are expected to come to class prepared, having carefully read all the compulsory literature and submitted the assignments. 

In addition to the plenary sessions, students have three work-group sessions with their supervisor. These sessions focus on the actual writing of the research proposal. Depending on the supervisor these sessions will be run in groups or individually. 

Taught by Dr R. Olie.

The Master thesis constitutes the heart of the third and final semester of MSc International Management/CEMS programme. The Master thesis requires that students complete independent, individual research on a topic of their choosing, in the academic field of International Management. In practice, this will generally cover the fields of Strategic Management, Organisational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Supply Chain Management and Finance. Other disciplines including Entrepreneurship and Global Business and Stakeholder Management may also be considered.

As many students may find it difficult to develop their own research ideas or narrow the scope, ideas for thesis themes will be provided by professors of various academic departments. However, students will have ample freedom to explore specific research topics within these themes. The professor(s) of the theme will act as thesis coach. An important requirement for the research topic is the relevance for an international manager. Furthermore, the topic should be both theoretically and practically relevant. Practical issues without a theoretical basis and relevance fall outside the scope of the Master thesis.

The IM thesis provides students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of areas of interest, train their capacities of analysis and problem-solving, and improve their skills in practical scientific business and management research. The Master thesis is research-based and thus requires sufficient knowledge of methodology, the research process and effective methods of communicating research results. The Research Clinic at the start of the thesis semester provides a good basis for acquiring this knowledge. The research clinic introduces necessary elements for conducting academic and business research including problem formulation, data analysis, research design and writing a valuable report.

Review the course guide for more details.

Internships

You are required to do an internship abroad of at least 8 weeks. Most students join one of our CEMS corporate partners, although you are able to look independently for an organisation in which to pursue your internship. Because the internship is designed to be an intercultural experience, it must be taken in a country with which you are relatively unfamiliar. This is your chance to get a real taste of a future profession or organisation. Many students acquire their first job from the contacts they establish during this period.

Examples of Internships taken by IM /CEMS Students

  1. DaimlerChrysler AG, Germany 
    Optimising the testing strategy and product quality of several Mercedes-Benz series 
  2. UBS AG, Switzerland 
    Researching the energy derivative field in Europe 
  3. L’Oreal, UK 
    Marketing department 
  4. Volkswagen Group China, China 
    Production readiness department 
  5. Emerson Process Management, Singapore 
    Developing and executing a co-ordinates plan for the yearly sales meeting 
  6. Procter & Gamble, Belgium 
    Improving the Benelux intranet site concerning human resources 
  7. Frape Behr, Spain 
    Purchasing department 
  8. DZ Bank, Germany 
  9. Mergers and acquisitions, and initial public offerings

Exchanges

As a student of IM/CEMS, you are required to spend the autumn or spring semester at a CEMS partner university. Each school applies the same curriculum structure to their course design and a local CEMS Club provides an active social life for the international student body, helping to build the CEMS community spirit.

Skills

Skill Seminars are training seminars in practical skills offered within the CEMS network. They are essential to kick-starting an effective professional career and fundamental to adjusting easily to an international management environment. Skills seminars may be offered by a CEMS school or by CEMS corporate partners and are often offered in small-group settings to ensure and interactive dimension. 

Topics may include: 

  • Personal/leadership development 

  • Intercultural (management) skills 

  • Project Management 

  • Group work skills 

  • (International) negotiation techniques 

  • Presentation skills 

  • CV building and job application preparation 

  • business communication 

In order to meet graduation requirements, CEMS students must accrue minimum six skills seminar days, of which: 

  1. 2 days must be in the form of the Global Citizenship seminar at the beginning of the spring semester 

  2. And four additional days of a student’s choice must be taken  

For IM/CEMS home students, one they have completed the above requirements and the Personal Leadership Development (PLD) module, they will be issued 4 EC toward the MSc International Management curriculum. 

Languages

On completion of the International Management/CEMS programme, you must have minimum proven proficiency in at least two languages in addition to English. You are expected to improve language skills of your own accord, and your standards in both foreign languages should improve during your studies at RSM. Erasmus University's Language and Training Centre organises special language courses and language level tests.

Note regarding taking courses if you are not an RSM master student: RSM does not offer the possibility for non-RSM students (master or otherwise) to take RSM MSc courses outside of official exchange partnerships or other inter-faculty agreements. If you are interested in learning more about corporate social responsibility, sustainability, or business ethics, please refer to our Open Programmes section.

For more information on all international opportunities offered at RSM, visit the website of our International Office.

Learn more

Why this programme?

Factsheet

CEMS community

Faculty

Model UNFCCC

Language requirements

Career perspectives

An alumna talks about the CEMS programme at RSM

An alumna talks about RSM’s MSc in IM CEMS

RSM’s MSc International Management/CEMS programme provides excellent preparation for your international management career. Evidence shows that graduates obtain good jobs.

CEMS graduates from all CEMS schools in 2017 showed that they find jobs quickly and the skills we teach at RSM – plus the international networking aspect of our programme – really work:

  • 97% are employed within three months of graduation or continuing their studies
  • 75% work for a multinational company
  • 36% work outside their home country
  • 51% of CEMS graduates work for a CEMS Corporate Partner
  • 98% would recommend their CEMS experience to a friend

You will graduate with the skills needed to adapt to changing environments; alumni have told us this helps them in earning promotions.

Our programme gives you the skills to be able to work in a wide variety of industry sectors. CEMS graduates work in:

  • Consulting 28%
  • Technology 18%
  • Consumer goods 13%
  • Finance 11%
  • Education 4%
  • Pharma/Healthcare 4%
  • Other 4%

Non-EEA nationals who have earned a diploma from a higher education institute in the Netherlands can apply for a special residence permit called the orientation year after completing their studies. The 'Orientation Year for Graduates Seeking Employment' is a residence permit aimed at retaining foreign talent for the Dutch labour market. During this orientation year you are free to work without a work permit. Participants who find a job during this period can change their orientation year into a residence permit for Highly Skilled Migrants under more favourable terms.

For the most up-to-date information please visit the website of the Nuffic.

View LinkedIn profiles of our graduates

You can read more about our graduates and their career progress from their public LinkedIn profiles.

Tip: you can see more of our graduates’ profile information if you are not signed in to your LinkedIn account. Sign out of LinkedIn, then click the links.

Good to know

Career Centre

Alumni networks

MSc employment report

Vacancies for CEMS students

Studying at RSM

A student on the RSM MSc in IM CEMS

A student on the RSM MSc in IM CEMS

The RSM Experience

Education for life

Studying at RSM will be a life-changing experience. Your master degree will prepare you for a fulfilling professional life as a capable, self-assured individual. It will make you valuable to business and attractive to employers because it teaches you skills that make the most of your innovative mind. You will be challenged in and outside of the classroom, and you will gain an education based on the latest developments in business. Your master degree from RSM will include RSM’s promise of life-long learning, and membership of the more than 40,000-strong alumni network that is present in more than 110 countries which hosts activities and events all over the world.

Open intellectual culture

Your education at RSM is valuable. You will learn from academics who produce the highest quality research and the most innovative management thinking. In the classroom, sharing and questioning opinions is encouraged – yours and those of your fellow students, as well as the professors’. Many of RSM’s faculty members are young and passionate professors and researchers with outstanding academic credentials. Their work is published in top international management journals.

Engaging environment

Professors’ doors are always open for students who have questions, projects or ideas. Depending on the study programme, students have different opportunities to tailor their programme. This can, for example, take the form of a minors course, an internship, an exchange at one of over 160 partner schools worldwide, elective choices, the participation in a consulting project with a company or public sector organisation, or a thesis project in their specific area of interest. RSM’s strong links with local and international businesses and organisations offer opportunities for practical projects and real-life collaborations.

Rotterdam, a future-oriented city

Living and studying in Rotterdam has never been better. Rotterdam is home to one of the largest and busiest ports in the world and many multinational companies have their headquarters here. The city is famous for its stunning modern architecture, such as the Centraal Station or its covered food market, the Markthal. At the same time, the city authorities are forward-thinking in improving its liveability. There’s no shortage of restaurants, museums and theatres, yet Rotterdam is still an extremely student-friendly city with plenty of affordable student housing, and a bustling nightlife that includes events organised by students associations.

Find out more about life in the city of Rotterdam.

RSM Master Students

Talk to a student ambassador!

Learn more about student life

More information

CEMS Club Rotterdam

Explore the campus

Life in the city

Coming from abroad

Fees & Scholarships

The combination of affordable tuition fees and living costs together with quality education and an excellent global reputation make a Masters degree at RSM a clever investment.

Tuition fees 2022-2023

The 2022-2023 tuition fee for the MSc programmes is approximately €20,700 for non-EEA students. The Dutch government contributes towards this cost for students who hold a nationality from a country belonging to the European Economic Area (EEA). These students therefore only pay the statutory fee of €2,209 in 2022-2023. 

For EEA nationals who have already completed a master in the Netherlands (and obtained the diploma) the tuition fee for a 2nd master is approximately €12,000.

The MSc International Management - CEMS (18 months) is a longer programme, for which the tuition fee will have to be paid for the duration of the programme. The expected tuition fee for the 18-month MSc International Management - CEMS programme is €31,050 for non-EEA students and €3,314 for EEA students.

Please note that all these tuition fee tariffs are subject to change.

Scholarships

The number of scholarships is limited and mainly merit based. If a scholarship covers only the tuition fees, be aware that you need to finance your own living expenses (rent, food and insurances) for the duration of your studies. RSM does not offer scholarships for the pre-master programme. We do however offer a maximum of 2 scholarships per academic year to RSM pre-master students enrolling in an MSc programme.

Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) offers multiple scholarships to prospective students from non-EEA countries who are not entitled to pay the EEA tuition fee, provided their grades are considered ‘excellent’. RSM also offers one scholarship, the Erasmus Trustfonds Scholarship, to students from EEA countries. 

Besides scholarships awarded by RSM, there are also scholarships awarded by the Dutch government or other organisations that are available if you meet certain criteria such as nationality, age, etc We have listed some of them below but we encourage you to use resources such as Grantfinder or the Scholarship Portal to find additional scholarships.

Scholarship tips

  • Contact the Ministry for Higher Education in your home country to see whether there are scholarship options.
  • We have virtual information session covering all you need to know about scholarships and financial aid. Watch it here.

For students from the Netherlands or the EU/EEA, it may be possible to apply for limited funding towards payment of your tuition fees. Find out whether you meet the nationality and age requirements and read more information about the application process here.

Handling fee

After having filled in all of the necessary information on the Online Application Form (OLAF) and uploaded the required documents, applicants with a degree obtained outside the Netherlands will be asked to pay a non-refundable €100 handling fee. This fee can be paid online via the Erasmus Payment System which uses either iDEAL (for those with a Dutch bank account) or PayPal (which can be linked to any bank account or credit card worldwide). It is important that applicants complete the payment process as indicated, otherwise the system cannot register the payment.   

Additional expenses

The additional expenses in addition to tuition and general living costs vary per programme and may include:

  • Study materials such as books, readers and business cases
  • Costs involved in kick-off meetings
  • Costs related to travel, international excursions and compulsory exchange semesters or internships abroad

Living Costs

For a reasonable standard of living in the Netherlands, you should have an income of approximately €1,000 per month or €12,000 per year (excluding the tuition fee). Here is an example of monthly expenditure: 

  • Furnished Accommodation, including gas and electricity €525
  • Medical insurance €50
  • Telephone €25
  • Food €200
  • Books, recreation, clothing, public transport, etc. €200 

Total costs per month €1,000 

Study and work - part-time jobs

Please ensure, prior to your arrival at RSM, that you have or will have sufficient funding available to finance your stay at RSM. Finding a part-time job, may be an option, but can not be guaranteed. You should therefore not rely on finding other ways to supplement your income during your studies. For additional information on obtaining a part-time job, visit the website of the Nuffic.

For EEA students there are no formal restrictions in finding work in the Netherlands, but students with a lack of Dutch language skills will find it difficult to secure employment. Non-EEA students are subject to labour regulations, which makes the likelihood of obtaining a work permit very small. We therefore ask students not to rely on this possibility. We do not encourage students to combine studies with the heavy workload from a part-time job.

Admission requirements

The application for all programmes starting September 2022 are closed. The application for September 2023 will open 1 October.

Programme deadline 31 January 2023.

Selection

Language requirements for getting into the RSM CEMS programme

Admission & Application - IM/CEMS

The selection for IM/CEMS is very competitive so it's important that applicants are well prepared for the selection process. The selection consists of the following phases:

For information about the CEMS programme and the partner schools, visit the CEMS website and check the official CEMS videos. You can also talk to current students of the programme.

Familiarize yourself with the admissions requirements, including the CEMS specific Language Requirements.

Apply on time! Application starts on the 1st of October and closes on the 31st of January. We advise you to apply as early as possible. If the majority of applicants have applied early, the final results can also be published earlier

All applicants who apply on time and meet the minimum requirements for the IM/CEMS programme will be invited to an Online Interview.

1. Submit your application starting from 1 October via the Online Application Form (OLAF). You can find the detailed instructions listed on the How to Apply page. The final deadline is the 31st of January, but we advise you to submit your application as soon as your have all the required documents ready.

2. Evaluation: Once you have submitted your application, the RSM Admissions Office will evaluate your application. IM/CEMS applicants will be given priority in the evaluation process. If your application meets the minimum requirements, you will be invited to take the online interview.

3. Complete the online interview:

You will receive an invitation link to the interview including detailed instructions via the Online Application Form (OLAF). You will have 14 days to complete the interview.

  • The interview will focus on your motivation to participate in the programme as well as two key CEMS competencies: initiative taking and result orientation. 
  • This online interview is conducted using the RIVS platform.
  • The interview is not live, so you can answer the questions at your convenience from anywhere in the world. You do however need to complete the interview in one sitting, and you have limited time to prepare and answer each question.
  • You'll be able to familiarize yourself with the RIVS system before recording your answers.
  • Your answers should be formulated using the "STAR" interview method.

After the 31 January application deadline all applications received around the deadline will be evaluated. Once all eligible applicants have completed their online interviews, the Admissions Office will make a final ranking of the applicants. 

Scoring methodology:

The final ranking is based on scores given on the applicants Grade Point Average or GMAT and the total score obtained from the interview:

  • For applicants from Dutch research universities the GPA is used for the scoring. 
  • For applicants coming from universities outside the Netherlands the GMAT is used for the scoring. It's not possible to use the GPA as the quantitative factor for students coming from non-Dutch universities, as GPA's between different education systems vary greatly and are not directly comparable.
  • The GPA / GMAT count for 50% of the final score and the interview for the other 50%.

Results: Students will be notified of the outcome of the selection procedure, including the allotted exchange destination as soon as possible. Approximately 70 students will be selected for the programme and receive a (conditional) offer of admission. The allocated exchange destination and semester will also be communicated together with the offer (more information is listed in the next section).

Applicants who are not selected for the IM/CEMS programme, will be offered alternative admission to our other MSc programmes. It's only possible to receive an offer of admission to programmes which still have spots available. Some programmes may have reached maximum capacity by the time the CEMS results are available. 

Be aware: Formal admission to the MSc IM/CEMS will only take place after the applicant has received an unconditional offer of admission. All of the conditions listed in the letter of admission must be fulfilled before the applicant is allowed to begin the IM/CEMS master. If the applicant has failed to meet any of the conditions listed by 31 August, the offer of admission will be withdrawn.

All students in the IM/CEMS programme complete one semester at one of the CEMS partner schools.

During the application process, applicants are asked to indicate their top 12 preference of the CEMS partner school(s) they would like to attend for exchange. The listing is done when filling in the Online Application Form (OLAF). When receiving an offer of admission for the IM/CEMS programme, you will also be informed of the exchange destination and semester you have been allocated. 

Exchange slots per school, however, are limited. This means that students applying for popular destinations may not be selected for their first choice, but instead for their second, third, or other preferred school. Applicants with higher grades and interview results will have better chances for selection for their preferred destination. Therefore a specific exchange destination should not be your main reason for choosing the IM/CEMS programme.

In addition, the following guidelines will be followed:

  • It's preferred that external (non-RSM) applicants spend the fall semester at RSM, to allow these students to experience student life at RSM and in Rotterdam first, prior to going on exchange. 

  • Exchange is  not possible to the applicants country of origin or the country of undergraduate studies/bachelor programme. 
  • It is not possible to change or negotiate your exchange destinations after the selection.

Information on the CEMS partner schools can be found on www.cems.org.

All students in the IM/CEMS programme complete one semester at one of the CEMS partner schools.

During the application process, applicants are asked to indicate their top 12 preference of the CEMS partner school(s) they would like to attend for exchange. The listing is done when filling in the Online Application Form (OLAF). When receiving an offer of admission for the IM/CEMS programme, you will also be informed of the exchange destination and semester you have been allocated. 

Exchange slots per school, however, are limited. This means that students applying for popular destinations may not be selected for their first choice, but instead for their second, third, or other preferred school. Applicants with higher grades and interview results will have better chances for selection for their preferred destination. Therefore a specific exchange destination should not be your main reason for choosing the IM/CEMS programme.

In addition, the following guidelines will be followed:

  • It's preferred that external (non-RSM) applicants spend the fall semester at RSM, to allow these students to experience student life at RSM and in Rotterdam first, prior to going on exchange. 

  • Exchange is  not possible to the applicants country of origin or the country of undergraduate studies/bachelor programme. 
  • It is not possible to change or negotiate your exchange destinations after the selection.
Country University name Additional information

Australia

The University of Sydney Business School, USYD

> 4 spots available

Austria

Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, WUW

< 4 spots available

Belgium

Université Catholique de Louvain, UCL (Louvain-la-Neuve)

< 4 spots available

Brazil

Fundaçao Getulio Vargas - EAESP (Sao Paulo)

< 4 spots available

Canada

Richard Ivey School of Business (London)

< 4 spots available
Chile Universidad Adolfo Ibanez < 4 spots available

China

Tsinghua SEM, TSEM (Beijing)

< 4 spots available, (fall semester only, unless the student can speak Chinese. Students with Chinese, Hong Kong, Macau or Taiwanese nationality are not accepted) 
Czech Republic University of Economics Prague, VSE < 4 spots available

Denmark

Copenhagen Business School, CBS (Copenhagen)

< 4 spots available
Egypt The American University in Cairo School of Business < 4 spots available

Finland

Aalto University School of Economics (Helsinki)

< 4 spots available

France

HEC Paris, (Jouy-en-Josas)

< 4 spots available

Germany

University of Cologne, UoC

< 4 spots available

Hong Kong

Hong Kong School of Science and Technology, HKUST

< 4 spots available, students with Chinese nationality are not accepted)

Hungary

Corvinus University of Budapest, CUB

< 4 spots available

India

Indian Institute of Management Calcutta

< 4 spots available, fall semester only

Ireland

UCD Michael Smurfit School of Business, UCD (Dublin)

< 4 spots available

Italy

Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi, UB (Milan)

> 4 spots available, students with Italian nationality are not accepted

Japan

Keio University (Tokyo)

< 4 spots available, fall semester only
Korea

Korea University Business School (KUBS)

< 4 spots available

Norway

Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration, NHH (Bergen)

< 4 spots available

Poland

Warsaw School of Economics, SGH

< 4 spots available

Portugal

Faculdade de Economia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Lisbon)

< 4 spots available

Russia

Graduate School of Management, St Petersburg State University

< 4 spots available

Singapore

NUS Business School

< 4 spots available
South Africa University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business 1 spot available

Spain

ESADE (Barcelona)

< 4 spots available

Sweden

Stockholm School of Economics, SSE

> 4 spots available

Switzerland

University of St. Gallen, HSG

< 4 spots available

Turkey

Koc University, Graduate School of Business (Istanbul)

< 4 spots available

U.K.

London School of Economics, LSE

< 4 spots available
United States Cornell SC Johnson College of Business 1 spot available

All applicants who have been selected for participation in the IM/CEMS programme must confirm acceptance of the offer within 14 days to the Admissions Office.

Upon confirmation MSc Programme Management will send the students' nominations to the CEMS partner universities.

Admitted IM/CEMS students will also be responsible for a separate CEMS-specific €100 registration and handling fee. This fee is entirely separate from tuition that is paid to EUR/RSM. Students will receive further payment instructions directly from the CEMS Global Office.

Are you a current RSM student? 

  • If you are not selected for the IM/CEMS programme butmeet all of the requirements for the regular International Master Exchange Programme you will still be eligible to apply for regular master exchange.
  • The deadlines for master exchange nomination for most partner schools is 1 May, so students are advised to submit a complete master exchange application before mid-April. For more information on master exchange, please contact: Linda de Vries, Head of International Office (lvries@rsm.nl).
  • IM/CEMS applicants who are offered admission to the programme but decline their offer are not eligible for participation in the regular International Exchange Programme.

Immigration

COVID19

FOR THE MOST RECENT IMMIGRATION INFORMATION PLEASE CHECK THE FAQ’s

Important immigration information for NON EU/EEA Full-time BScIBA and MSc students

Depending on your nationality, you might need an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit for the Netherlands, issued by the Dutch Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND).  Students can only apply for an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit through the RSM/ Erasmus University. Only with a valid Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit you are allowed to study at RSM/ Erasmus University.

Needless to say that RSM/ Erasmus University is not the institution that determines the requirements. The IND is the official governmental body that sets the rules and procedures.

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their offer and hold a passport from an EU/EEA country do not need to apply for an Entry Visa and / or Residence Permit.

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their conditional or unconditional offer and have a nationality and hold a passport of one of the following countries: Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, South Korea, USA or Vatican State. 

Full-time BScIBA and MSc students who accepted their conditional or unconditional offer, have a nationality and hold a passport of one of the countries mentioned in Group III and IV. This procedure also applies to students with a Surinamese nationality.

Note for Chinese students
Obtain a Nuffic Certificate : 
All Chinese students (with the exception of students from Hong Kong, Taiwan and students with a British Overseas Nationality) must register with EP-Nuffic for a ‘Nuffic Certificate’ before their immigration application can be started. The certificate is a document providing an assessment of your English language proficiency and of the authenticity of your educational degrees and diplomas. For more information, see the Nuffic website

Validity Entry Visa
An Entry Visa is valid for 90 days (counted from the day that you pick up your Entry Visa).

Validity Residence Permit 
A Residence Permit is valid for the duration of your study plus three extra months. This means that you do not have to apply for an extension after one year.

I already have a Residence Permit for another EU/EEA Country

NON-EU/EEA students holding a (permanent or temporary) valid Residence Permit (e.g. for study purposes) for another EU/EEA Country no longer need to apply for an Entry Visa for the Netherlands. For these students, the procedure for a Residence Permit application applies. A copy of the EU/EEA-Residence Permit must be uploaded in your application. The Residence Permit must be valid at the time of the application, and still be valid when the student collects his/her Residence Permit in the Netherlands.

I already have a Residence Permit for the Netherlands

NON-EU/EEA students holding already a Residence Permit for the Netherlands (e.g. for study purposes, stay with partner or family, employment), need to apply for Switching InstitutionsChange of Purpose or an Extension of your Residence Permit. Requests can be sent after being completely registered (onwards September 1st) to EUR International Office: immigration@eur.nl or 3 months prior to the expiration of your permit.

The Financial Requirements (determined by the IND)

Before your immigration application is sent to the IND, you are required to prove that you have sufficient financial means to cover your study (only for the first year of your study)

  1. the Tuition Fee (BSc IBA €9,600.-, MSc €18,700.-;
  2. the Immigration Fee (€ 192.-)
  3. the Costs of Living for 12 months (€11,400.-: €950.- for every month of your stay in the Netherlands)

Note: it is not possible to pay your tuition fee in instalments

Contact details for the immigration application

Your main point of contact for the immigration application at RSM/ Erasmus University is Ms. Joyce Maliepaard.

Once you have a conditional or unconditional offer you receive the ‘Immigration application process’ (from mid March on). The guidelines explains the procedure to successfully process your application. After having received the information you will be registered in student registration system ‘Osiris Zaak’ (‘Osiris Zaak’ opens in  April).

After your registration in 'Osiris Zaak' your main point of contact is EUR Internatinonal Office (immigration@eur.nl). The immigration documents and invoice for the payment of the fees will be sent to you in 5 working days

Deadline for MSc students
The deadline for uploading your immigration application documents and your proof of payment in 'Osiris Zaak' is: JUNE 15th. If this deadline is not feasible for you, please send an email to visabscmsc@rsm.nl

Deadline for BScIBA students
The deadline for uploading your immigration application documents and your proof of payment in 'Osiris Zaak' is: JUNE 15th. If this deadline is not feasible for you, please send an email to visabscmsc@rsm.nl

Release date: March 2021

Housing

Looking for housing in Rotterdam? (MSc)

Housing information for full-time RSM students coming to Rotterdam

Although a complete and useful overview of housing information for International Students can be found on the housing pages of the Erasmus University, the information below especially applies to RSM’s first year BScIBA and MSc students coming from abroad. Arranging your stay

As in many major European cities, the demand for reasonably priced housing in Rotterdam is very high. Therefore, make it your number one priority and start searching immediately after being conditionally or unconditionally admitted to our BScIBA or one of the MSc programmes. As campus housing is limited, you may have to look for a room on the private market or seek other alternatives.

The ‘Short Stay Accommodations’ of RSM is run by the housing corporation SSH Student Housing (SSH), specialized in letting furnished accommodation.
For our first year BScIBA and MSc students coming from abroad, we reserve a range of furnished accommodations. Students can only apply for ‘Short Stay Accommodations’ for the first 12 months of their study (it is not possible to rent a room for less than 12 months). After 12 months you have to find accommodation by yourself. The SSH Accommodation is not available for partners or family of the student. 

Important: This message applies to all the students who have registered for the SSH housing for the 2022 academic year!

Please note that RSM has only 130 rooms to be divided among BSc and MSc students. A fair distribution will be made under the students. As SSH housing is limited, not every registration can be approved. Please be patient and waiting any approval. To increase your chances we strongly advice you to look for more housing possibilities here.

It is not possible to correspond about the result, neither by email nor by telephone

Available SSH housing/accommodation for BScIBA & MSc students
The SSH has four dorms you can choose from: one on-campus (Hatta Building) and three off-campus, only 15 minutes walking from the university (D'Blaauwe MolenOverhoningen and Erasmus International House). All rooms/apartments are fully fitted and furnished (not self-contained) and located at Struisenburgdwarsstraat in the district of Kralingen, This district offers everything that a student needs: the Erasmus University, little shops and typical student pubs are around the corner. The centre of Rotterdam and the Kralingse Bos are just a stone’s throw away. In most cases you have communal cooking facilities and sanitary fitting. Accommodations can not be visited in advance, but descriptions of the different buildings are available on the SSH website. Please not that rental prices are re-indexed every year.

When am I eligible to register for a room at the SSH ?
You can register for a room once you have been conditionally or unconditionally admitted to the first year BScIBA programme or one of the MSc programmes.

When and how can I register for a room at the SSH?

BScIBA students:

 

  • Tuesday 12 April 2022 at 12 PM: Start registration
  • Tuesday 21 April 2022 at 12 PM: Start booking

IMPORTANT NOTE: The SSH start the registration for all Bachelor students (Erasmus University students) on April 12th, while the BScIBA students get the outcome onwards April 15th. This means that RSM start approving your registration at the earliest on Thursday 21 April. The date of registration for the MSc students has been changed: 

MSc students:

 

Go to SHH*  and fill in:
City:                                          Rotterdam
Your educational institution:     Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR)
Type of Resident:                     EUR Full Year Student (15 August 2022 - 31 July 2023) 
                                                    

When and how can I reserve a room at the SSH?
You can reserve a room and only see all the available rooms once your registration has been approved by the RSM. The approval proces for BScIBA students takes place onwards 19 April and for the MSc students on 12 May.

For BSc students: select and reserve a room      
Log in to My SSH to reserve a room within 7 days*:
* If you have not selected a room within 7 days, your application will be set automatically to “not approved”. After this period you can no longer reserve accommodation via SSH (to give other students also a fair chance to apply for accommodation). 

SSH will handle the whole process – from making a room reservation to payments. For more information about the Terms and Conditions, the Rental Guide and the FAQ’s, please visit the site www.sshxl.nl/en. Any questions can be addressed to: Rotterdam@sshxl.nl

Xior Building is a student building right next to the campus of the RSM/ Erasmus University. This 8th floor building upholds 280 studio apartments with all private bathroom and kitchen facilities.

Registration & Reservation opens on:

  • Wednesday 11 May 2022 at 12.00 PM
  • Fixed rental period: 19 August 2022 – 7 August 2022

RSM is not in charge for the rental of these rooms and is only for students coming from abroad. Your registration will be checked by the Real Estate Services Department of the Erasmus University. All your questions can be addressed to rotterdam@xior.nl 

 

The RSM/Erasmus University has a partnership with the companies SSH, XIOR, The Cohesion Cobana, Roomplaza and the Student Hotel. Additional information on the below mentioned housing providers, and many more, are listed on the Erasmus University Housing pages.

International Student Housing Rooms (ISHR)
Is a private initiative to manage shared living properties in The Netherlands. It was founded by former students of Erasmus University Rotterdam, who now work in the financial industry. ISHR is not an intermediary. It is a landlord-owned operating platform, developed based on lessons learned from a decade of interactions between international students and Dutch private landlords.The EUR has agreed on a partnership with ISHR and we have reserved around 40 flat share rooms exclusively for our first year International Bachelor or Master students.

Registration starts on:
Monday 2 May 2022 at 12 PM. Fixed rental period: 10 August 2022 - 31 July 2023

The Cohesion Cobana 
Located in Katendrecht, Rotterdam. Katendrecht is a vibrant part of Rotterdam with a central location. The FIZZ Cobana has a variety of Friends apartments. This unique concept is a great way to share living space of your apartment, but still have all the privacy you want with your own bedroom. As a student of the Erasmus you will have a possibility to live with other Erasmus students in a Friends apartment. It’s a perfect blend of privacy and sociability, whenever you want it. The Erasmus University has reserved for its International students 40 rooms. 
How to register? Please find here all the information.

RoomPlaza 
Offers students the possibility to rent a flat with a group of like-minded people. They have 80 rooms for BSc and MSc students. You can apply as an existing group or use your find-a-flat mate tool to form your own. RoomPlaza has a safe booking process with a 100% guarantee of avoiding scams by fake accommodation providers. How to register? Please find here all the information.

The Student Hotel
A hotel located in Kralingen Rotterdam which offers fully furnished rooms with a private bathroom, shared or private kitchen, WiFi, flat screen TV. Included in the price is a bike, use of the gym, study rooms, lounges and game rooms, 24-hour reception, laundry room and a restaurant/bar 
How to book a room? Please find here all the information. 

Updated: 2 May 2022

 

Hostels in Rotterdam

Some suggestions:

Boat Hotel – a short stay apartment on a historical ship in the centre of Rotterdam.

King Kong Hostel - a very cool hostel that blends industrial design with 21st century contemporary art. It has a superb location in the beginning of Witte de Wittestraat which is in the heart of Rotterdam’s social scene and all the city’s best bars and restaurants are on your doorstep.

Hostel ROOM Rotterdam – located in Rotterdam’s historic Scheepvaartkwartier, near a beautiful little harbour. There are lots of good places for wining and dining in the area and close to the city’s main park.

Hostel Stayokay – this hostel is located in the city centre of Rotterdam in the striking cube houses. Next to Metro station “Blaak”.

As tenancy agreements are often only provided in Dutch (huurovereenkomst), we recommend you to view the additional information on this topic provided on the Erasmus University website.  There you can also find information on Dutch housing terms, and other information on how to arrange your stay and other useful tips, for example on how not to get scammed.

This is one of the most challenging yet most rewarding times of my life. We learn to be critical about long-standing concepts. IM/CEMS gives me the chance to follow my interest through electives while not losing sight of the bigger picture. And the best part: the people in the programme are open to new opinions, challenge your opinions, and come from a multitude of cultures and backgrounds. You learn with and also from your classmates.

Laura Maria Breuer (MSc International Management/CEMS 2021)

Laura Maria Breuer

Is it right for me?

CEMS students are academically high achieving and are also highly socially aware, culturally sensitive, and engaged in the world and with the people around them.

You and your classmates will be admitted to the programme based on your excellent bachelor performance, fluency in at least three languages, and a global orientation and motivation.

You’ll be part of a cohort of motivated, ambitious, and active students who work hard but also like to have fun together. Time management skills are essential, but also rewarding.

So if you are hard-working and enjoy meeting new people, the IM/CEMS programme is the right fit for you.

Are you still in doubt?

Would you like extra information or support? We are here to help!

More to explore

Take a virtual tour across our campus

RSM campus

Will you lead or will you follow?

I Will