Curriculum

Curriculum

The Master in Management track of the MSc in Business Administration is a 16 month, 90 EC programme, which consists of the following elements:

  • 60 EC towards the degree
  • 30 EC as foundation, which prepares students with bachelor qualifications in non-business subjects for master level business courses. The foundation is woven into the curriculum and usually appears as the first part of the course. No exemptions from it are possible.
    • This course contains a concise introduction to the domain of entrepreneurship theory and research. To apply the key concepts and tools in a real-life setting, teams will develop and revise their own startup opportunities and explore viable business models. Entrepreneurship is about turning unmet needs and unsolved problems into viable economic activity. The essence of entrepreneurship has been described as ‘the pursuit of opportunity without regard to the resources currently controlled.’ Entrepreneurship starts with the discovery of promising opportunities. Understanding the origins of such opportunities is key for startup entrepreneurs and existing companies alike to develop business models that will effectively create and capture value from the identified opportunities. Entrepreneurship is not just a process but also a mindset. In this module you develop that mindset by exploring the first stages of the process: the identification and evaluation of opportunities and the search for viable business models.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. F.P.H. Jaspers.

    • This course discusses the corporate governance challenges of various kinds of private enterprise organization, as well as the measures and practices that can be used to meet these challenges. After introducing a general framework, we will look at the corporate governance challenges of publicly listed firms, family firms, (professional) partnerships, State owned enterprises, and nonprofit organizations, such as philanthropies, for example. Although we focus mainly on the role and interests of owners in these firms, we will also discuss how corporate governance affects the interests of other stakeholders, such as employees, customers, creditors or society at large.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by prof. J. van Oosterhout.

    • It is common knowledge that some firms perform better than others, yet the causes of performance differences across firms are less obvious. Strategic management aims to provide explanations to this question by illuminating how firms can organize their internal resources and capabilities so as to align them with the environment to achieve competitive advantage, enabling them to outperform their competitors. This course introduces the key concepts, tools, and principles of strategic management and illustrates their real-life applications. Specifically, the course focuses on information, analyses, and organizational processes managers can use to devise strategies, position their businesses, and pursue competitive advantage.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. K. Kavusan.

    • The primary objective of this course is for you to develop an in-depth understanding of the frameworks, concepts, models, and paradigms that collectively form the foundation for (strategic) marketing management. Secondary objectives include developing skills in the application of this knowledge for making decisions at the business level and developing an appreciation for the inter-disciplinary nature of marketing strategy.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by prof. G.H. van Bruggen.

    • Accounting is referred to as the language of business, because it is widely used to describe all types of business activities. This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of accounting. We discuss the various ways in which financial and non-financial information can be collected, and how this information is communicated to those making decisions. In general, we distinguish between financial accounting and management accounting.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by prof.dr. M van Rinsum

    • Over the last few decades the international competitive environment in which firms operate has changed. Shortening of product life cycles due to rapid technological change and globalization of markets have intensified competition for the multinational enterprise (MNE). The intensification of external pressures requires (future) managers to be able to understand and swiftly reply to such market changes. This international strategy course is primarily designed to provide (future) managers with the knowledge how to create and sustain competitive advantage in an international market place in the form of firm internationalization.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. B.C. Pinkham.

    • The course presents an overview of basic quantitative research methods and techniques that are frequently used in management and provides a context for developing skills in the practical application of these methods. Quantitative methods deal with the formulation of research hypotheses, setting up causal relationships schemes, quantitative data collection, and statistical methods to perform univariate (hypothesis testing and estimation), bivariate (anova, t-test, correlation and contingency tables) and multivariate (regression) analyses. Course evaluation involves individual tests and a group assignment and group presentation in which a problem statement and research hypotheses need to be developed by the students, the process of data collection has to be conducted in real life and applied to the identified research question.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. J. van Dalen.

       

    • This course consists of a mixture of interactive lectures, in-class exercises, and workshops that allow students to explore key topics in organizational behavior (e.g., cooperation and conflict, cognition and information processing, diversity, status and power) from the specific lens of teams and workgroups.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. I.J. Hoever.

    • ‘Your Future Career’ consists of various exercises, lectures, and other formats to prepare you for your future labor market. As this preparation is not a straightforward, easy process we invite you first to start with an internal journey and learn more about yourself – both in terms of personal drivers and interests, but also in terms of behavior in teams.

      Sessions will include not only job search and acquisition techniques, but also the tools of personal career development that provide the best insight into tactical decision-making; identifying and choosing from options which will lead to the most career fulfillment now and in the future.

      Review the course guide for more details.

    • During the course Business & Society an overview will be given of the different theories and concepts for understanding and managing the interfaces between state, market and civil society. The interfaces are studied from normative, institutional, strategic and communicative perspectives. The course addresses the global issues that affect, and are affected, by business. An issue is a topic over which ‘expectation gaps’ exist and which often provide reputational risks.

      The number of issues for which firms have been held accountable since the 1990s has boomed. We will discuss the extent to which the issues are growing or declining in importance; how various interest groups come to various definitions of the problem; to what extent firms can be considered part of the problem and/or part of the solution; and whether a ‘sustainable corporate story’ is conceivable or already exists.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by prof. R.J.M. van Tulder.

    • What are the biases that affect the choices of managers and consumers, and what heuristics do these agents use? How do other people influence their decisions? How can you approach decisions so to optimize their outcomes? How can you create value in a negotiation? How do you and succeed in obtaining a bigger share of the pie? We will try to answer these questions by using a mixture of lectures, class discussions and exercises, and assignments.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. G. Paolacci.

    • This course provides an introduction to corporate finance. The themes we deal with in this course are particularly relevant for business decision-making in areas as whether or not to invest in a project, how to finance an investment, and how to deal with uncertainty.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. T. Lambert.

    • In this course we use disruptive innovation to discuss the core elements of innovation management: innovation strategy, business model innovation, the process from idea generation to implementation, innovation project management and innovations in an organizational context. Consequently, this course will provide you the skills and knowledge to manage innovation processes, and in particular to sense disruptive ideas and innovations, to transform your organization to foster disruptive ideas from generation to execution, and to seize the opportunity to shape the business landscape.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. H.J.D. Klapper.

    • This course will have two central themes: (1) How to think systematically and strategically about aspects of managing the organization's human assets, and (2) what really needs to be done to implement these policies and to achieve competitive advantage.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. H.M.S. Dietz.

    • The course is multi-disciplinary in nature and links to a number of other areas, including finance, operations management, marketing and accounting, through the choice of cases, thus adding an analytical dimension to the teaching of these areas.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. I. Fragkos.

    • The course provides students with an overview of one of the most challenging areas in business: operations and supply chain management (O&SCM). O&SCM focuses on the systematic planning, design, and operation of business processes which deliver goods and services. Managing the manufacturing and service processes is an increasingly complex and challenging task not only due to the fact that they span across the entire organization, but also due to business trends such as globalization, outsourcing, product proliferation, and fast development of IT that challenge the fitness of O&SCM.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. Q. Kong.

    • This course focuses on the study of organisations and the influence of information systems. The course comprises topics such as new business models based on ICT, new ways of working and new forms of cooperation within and between firms. Students will explore the function of information- and communications technology and the ways in which it affects how people and businesses communicate and cooperate.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. Z Cao.

    • In this module, students working in teams will receive an invitation to analyse a very real problem faced by a company. Based on their analysis, students will develop potential solutions over a three-month period and present their findings to senior managers from the organisation.

      For an impression of the Consultancy Project, please click here.

      Review the course guide for more details.

       

    • This course contains a concise introduction to the domain of corporate entrepreneurship theory and research. To apply the key concepts and tools in a real-life setting, teams will explore the impact of new technologies, in particular fintech, on established business models, in particular in the logistics sector, and set out to discover new digital business and growth opportunities.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. F.P.H. Jaspers.

    • As part of the process of developing their own thesis, students will work in teams to explore specific areas of research as defined by an experienced member of the RSM faculty who serves as coach. Students will have the opportunity to formulate their own research questions and answer them from a number of management perspectives. The output of this course is a thesis proposal.

      Review the course guide for more details.

      Taught by dr. I. Bogenrieder.