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Profile

Dr. Genevsky received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Stanford University with a focus on decision-making and affective neuroscience. Previously, he received his bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Binghamton University (SUNY).  Dr. Genevsky's research explores the social and emotional influences that shape consumer decisions and behavior. Using behavioral experimentation, market-level data analysis, and neuroimaging, he probes emotional and cognitive reactions to decision-making scenarios and subsequent influences on preference and choice. Relatedly, current projects explore the potential to scale what we learn in the lab to develop models that more accurately describe and predict market-level behavior in the real world.  For more information please visit my website.

Publications

Academic (15)
  • Tong, L., Acikalin, Y., Genevsky, A., Shiv, B., & Knutson, B. (2020). Brain activity forecasts video engagement in an internet attention market. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Ame, 117(12), 6936-6941. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1905178117

  • Asutay, E., Genevsky, A., Barret, LF., Hamilton, JP., Slovic, P., & Vastfjall, D. (2019). Affective calculus: The construction of affect through information integration over time. Emotion. https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000681

  • Kim, B., Genevsky, A., Knutson, B., & Tsai, J. (2019). Culturally-valued facial expressions enhance loan request success. Emotion, 20(7), 1137-1153. https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000642

  • Knutson, B., & Genevsky, A. (2018). Neuroforecasting aggregate choice. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 27(2), 110-115. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721417737877

  • Genevsky, A., Yoon, C., & Knutson, B. (2017). When brain beats behavior: neuroforecasting crowdfunding outcomes. Journal of Neuroscience, 37(36), 8625-8634. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1633-16.2017

  • Genevsky, A., & Knutson, B. (2015). Neural affective mechanisms predict market-level microlending. Psychological Science, 26(9), 1411-1422. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797615588467

  • Genevsky, A., Vastfjall, D., Slovic, P., & Knutson, B. (2013). Neural underpinnings of the identifiable victim effect: Affect shifts preferences for giving. Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 17188-17196.

  • Genevsky, A., & Gard, DE. (2012). The effect of choice on the physiology of emotion: An affective startle modulation study. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 84, 80-85.

  • Gard, DE., Cooper, S., Fisher, M., Genevsky, A., Mikels, JA., & Vinogradov, S. (2011). Evidence for an emotion maintenance deficit in schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research, 187.

  • Dale, CL., Findlay, AM., Adcock, RA., Vertinski, M., Fisher, M., Genevsky, A., Aldebot, S., & Vinogradov, S. (2010). Timing is everything: neural response dynamics during syllable processing and its relation to higher-order cognition in schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 75.

  • Genevsky, A., Garrett, CT., Alexander, PP., & Vinogradov, S. (2010). Cognitive training in schizophrenia: a neuroscience-based approach. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 12.

  • Dale, CL., Findlay, AM., Adcock, RA., Genevsky, A., Vertinski, M., Luks, TL., & Vinogradov, S. (2009). Perceptual interference exacerbates Voice Onset Time-dependent syllable discrimination and alters performance-related MEG response dynamics in patients with schizophrenia. NeuroImage, 47.

  • Adcock, RA., Dale, C., Fisher, M., Aldebot, S., Genevsky, A., Simpson, GV., Nagarajan, S., & Vinogradov, S. (2009). When top-down meets bottom-up: auditory training enhances verbal memory in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35.

  • Gard, DE., Fisher, M., Garrett, C., Genevsky, A., & Vinogradov, S. (2009). Motivation and its relationship to neurocognition, social cognition, and functional outcome in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 115.

  • Asutay, E., Genevsky, A., Slovic, P., & Vastfjall, D. (2020). Affective context and its uncertainty drives momentary affective experience. Emotion. https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000912

Professional (1)

Academic (1)
  • Genevsky, A., & Yoon, C. (2022). Neural basis of consumer decision making and neuroforecasting. In L. R. Kahle, T. M. Lowrey, & J. Huber (Eds.), APA Handbook of Consumer Psychology (pp. 563-577). American Psychological Association. https://doi.org/10.1037/0000262-027

Courses

Neuroeconomics: how the brain decides

  • Study year: 2022/2023, 2021/2022
  • Code: B3MIN1018
  • Level: Bachelor, Bachelor 3, Bachelor 3

Marketing Management

  • Study year: 2022/2023, 2021/2022, 2020/2021
  • Code: BT1203
  • Level: Bachelor 1, Pre-master

Past courses

Business Management

  • Study year: 2021/2022
  • Code: B3MIN1054
  • Level: Bachelor 3

Specialization Module on Consumer Behavior

  • Study year: 2021/2022
  • Code: BERMASC039
  • ECTS: 3 Level: Master, PhD

Marketing Management

  • Study year: 2020/2021, 2019/2020, 2018/2019, 2017/2018, 2016/2017
  • Code: BAB25
  • Level: Bachelor 2, Bachelor 2, Pre-master

Neuroeconomics: how the brain decides

  • Study year: 2020/2021, 2019/2020, 2018/2019
  • Code: BKBMIN018
  • Level: Bachelor, Bachelor 3, Bachelor 3

Marketing Management

  • Study year: 2019/2020
  • Code: BT1103
  • Level: Bachelor 1

Featured in the media

  • CROWD PLEASERS: USING NEUROSCIENCE TO IDENTIFY CROWDFUNDING SUCCESS

    Alexander Genevsky, Assistant Professor at the Department of Marketing Management of RSM has conducted a study regarding crowdfunding. Knowing which crowdfunding projects will get off the ground is challenging, but Genevsky's…

  • New Research Finds Brain Scans Can Predict Successful Crowdfunding Projects

    Alexander Genevsky from RSM, along with colleagues from Stanford University and the University of Michigan, identified that heightened activity in certain parts of the brain allowed them to predict accurately which crowdfunding…

  • Succes financiering docu's te voorspellen met hersenscans

    Of course, you could conduct surveys or talk with focus groups to get a better picture of the success rates of a crowdfunding campaign, but that's "old school". In his recent study, Alexander Genevsky of RSM proves that brain…

  • Can brain scans predict successful crowdfunding projects?

    From independent films to entire start-ups, crowdfunding has backed countless projects across the world. In 2015, projects around the world raised a total of $34 billion via crowfunding platforms, and this trend is only projected…

  • Hersenscans voorspellen succes crowdfunding beter dan vragenlijsten

    A study by Alexander Genevsky at RSM along with fellow researchers from the University of Michigan and Stanford University shows that market researchers can use brain scans instead of surveys to understand consumer preferences.…

  • Hersenscans voorspellen succes van crowdfunding

    Until now, market researchers have used questionnaires to analyse consumer preferences and to assess whether a crowdfunding idea has a chance of success. Research by Alexander Genevsky of RSM shows that brain scans make such…

  • Startup success, and the new future of consumer testing

    A new study by Alexander Genevsky of RSM and researchers from Michigan and Stanford universities has discovered a means of predicting widespread consumer behaviour with the help of MRI scans. If the study is adequately replicated…

  • How scans of your brain could change the future of retail

    Using brain scans of just 30 people, researchers were able to forecast how hundreds of consumers would choose to spend their money – and the findings have implications for marketers. A study by Alexander Genevsky of RSM along with…

  • Brain Activity Predicts Crowdfunding Outcomes Better Than Self Reports

    Surveys and self-reports are a time-honoured way of trying to predict consumer behaviour, but they have limitations. People often give socially desirable answers or they simply don’t know or remember things clearly. A new study by…

  • Brain activity predicts crowdfunding outcomes better than self-reports

    A new study by Alexander Genevsky of RSM, Carolyn Yoon of the University of Michigan and Brian Knutson of Stanford University suggests that neural activity can not only be a better predictor of individual choices than surveys and…

  • How scans of your brain could change the future of retail

    According to a new study by Alexander Genevsky of RSM, Carolyn Yoon of the University of Michigan and Brian Knutson of Stanford University, neurons firing in the brain's "reward centre" predict widespread consumer behaviour more…

  • Brain Activity Predicts Crowdfunding Outcomes Better Than Self-Reports – Really

    Surveys and self-reports are a time-honoured way of trying to predict consumer behaviour, but they have limitations. People often given socially desirable answers, or simply don't know or remember things clearly. A study by…

  • Brain activity predicts crowdfunding outcomes better than self-reports

    A new study by Alexander Genevsky of RSM with colleagues shows that neural activity can be a better predictor of individual choices than surveys and self-reports. Further, they can help forecast aggregate outcomes in the…

  • Brain activity predicts crowdfunding outcomes better than self-reports

    Surveys and self-reports are a time-honoured way of trying to predict consumer behaviour, but they have limitations. People often give socially desirable answers or they simply don't know or remember things clearly. A new study by…

Featured on RSM Discovery

Brain activity can forecast success of crowd-funded projects

Brain scans, performed on a small number of people, can forecast if crowd-funded projects will be successful, weeks or even months later.